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Interpreter Foundation. “A Life Lived in Crescendo” Firesides — Presenters.” The Interpreter Foundation website.
Skousen, Royal. “A theory! A theory! We have already got a theory, and there cannot be any more…” Paper presented at the 2015 Exploring the Complexities in the English Language of the Book of Mormon Conference. March 14, 2015.
Interpreter Foundation. “A. Jane Birch is 2014 Winner of The Ruth M. Stephens Article Prize.” The Interpreter Foundation website. September 23, 2014.
LDS Perspectives. “Abinadi with Shon Hopkin.” The Interpreter Foundation website. February 28, 2018.
Smith, Andrew C. “Abinadi: A Minor Prophet, A Major Contributor.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 28 (2018): 261-272.

Abstract: The new edited volume Abinadi: He Came Among Them in Disguise, from the Book of Mormon Academy, is a valuable contribution to Book of Mormon studies. It should find a wide audience and stimulate greater and deeper thinking about the pivotal contributions of Abinadi to the Book of Mormon. It should, however, not be considered the end of the conversation. This review discusses the volume’s importance within Book of Mormon scholarship generally. It also highlights certain valuable contributions from each of the authors, and points out places where more can be said and deeper analysis is needed.

Review of Shon D. Hopkin, ed. Abinadi: He Came Among Them in Disguise (Provo and Salt Lake City, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, and Deseret Book, 2018), 404 pp. $27.99.

Bradshaw, Jeffrey M. “‘Abound in Hope’ — Stories of the Saints in the DR Congo, Part 6.” The Interpreter Foundation website. October 8, 2018.
Skousen, Royal. About this Online Edition of Analysis of Textual Variants of the Book of Mormon. Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies, 2014.

The version available here online at Interpreter: A Journal of Mormon Scripture is a reproduction of the

printed version of ATV, published in 2004–2009 by the Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon

Studies, now a part of the Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship at Brigham Young University.

No textual adjustments to the printed version have been made.

ATV appears in six books and gives a complete analysis of all the important cases of textual variation

(or potential variation) in the history of the Book of Mormon. It starts out with the title page of the Book

of Mormon and the two witness statements, then turns to 1 Nephi and continues through the Book of

Mormon to the end of Moroni.

Larsen, David J. “Abraham and Jehovah.” The Interpreter Foundation website. August 23, 2014.
Swift, Hales. “Abraham as Father of All the Faithful.” The Interpreter Foundation website. August 6, 2019.
Spendlove, Loren Blake. “Abraham’s Amen and Believing in Christ: Possible Applications in the Book of Mormon Text.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 49 (2021): 37-62.

Abstract: Following the discovery of delocutive verbs and their likely usage in the Hebrew Bible, Meredith Kline proposed that the verb האמין (he’emin) in Genesis 15:6 — traditionally interpreted as a denominative verb meaning “he believed” — should be understood as a delocutive verb meaning “he declared ‘amen.’” Rather than reading Genesis 15:6 as a passive statement — Abraham believed in Yahweh — Kline argued that we should interpret this verse in the active sense, that Abraham vocally declared his amen in Yahweh’s covenantal promise. In this light, I have analyzed various passages in the Book of Mormon that utilize similar verbiage — “believe in Christ,” for example — to examine how their meanings might be enhanced by interpreting the verbs as delocutives rather than denominatives.

Interpreter Foundation. “The Academy for Temple Studies Announces a Book Review Section.” The Interpreter Foundation website. May 23, 2013.
Halverson, Taylor. “Acts 10-15. Continuing Revelation.” The Interpreter Foundation website. August 14, 2015.
Halverson, Taylor. “Acts 21-28. Faithfully Witness of Christ.” The Interpreter Foundation website. October 10, 2015.
LDS Perspectives. “Adam Clarke’s Influence on Joseph Smith with Thomas A. Wayment.” The Interpreter Foundation website. September 27, 2017.
Smith, Robert F. “Adam Miller’s New Hermeneutic?” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 6 (2013): 1-7.

Review of Adam S. Miller (Collin College, McKinney, TX). Rube Goldberg Machines: Essays in Mormon Theology. Foreword by Richard Lyman Bushman. Draper, UT: Greg Kofford Books, 2012. 162 pp., with bibliography and indexes. $18.95. Paperback and e-book formats.

Hafen, Bruce C., and Marie K. Hafen. “Adam, Eve, the Book of Moses, and the Temple: The Story of Receiving Christ’s Atonement.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 46 (2021): 157-200.

Abstract: The authors begin by highlighting the importance of Book of Moses research that has discovered plausible findings for its historicity, rendering it at least reasonable to give the benefit of the doubt to sacred premises — even if, ultimately, the choice of premises is just that, a choice. Emphasizing the relevance of the Book of Moses to the temple, they note that the Book of Moses is not only an ancient temple text, but also the ideal scriptural context for a modern temple preparation course. Going further, the authors address an important question raised by some who have asked: “Since Christ is at the center of the gospel, why doesn’t the temple endowment teach the story of the life of Christ? What’s all this about Adam and Eve?” The answer given in detail in the paper is as follows: “The story of the life of Christ is the story of giving the Atonement. And the story of Adam and Eve is the story of receiving the Atonement. Their story is our story, too.”

[Editor’s Note: Part of our book chapter reprint series, this article is reprinted here as a service to the Latter-day Saint community. Original pagination and page numbers have necessarily changed, otherwise the reprint has the same content as the original.

See Bruce C. Hafen and Marie K. Hafen, “Adam, Eve, the Book of Moses, and the Temple: The Story of Receiving Christ’s Atonement,” in Tracing Ancient Threads in the Book of Moses: Inspired Origins, Temple Contexts, and Literary Qualities, edited by Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, David R. Seely, John W. Welch and Scott Gordon (Orem, UT: The Interpreter Foundation; Springville, UT: Book of Mormon Central; Redding, CA: FAIR; Tooele, UT: Eborn Books, 2021), page numbers forthcoming. Further information at https://interpreterfoundation.org/books/ancient-threads-in-the-book-of-moses/.]Historicity and Plausibility of the Book of Moses.

Hafen, Bruce C., and Marie K. Hafen. “Adam, Eve, the Book of Moses, and the Temple: The Story of Receiving Christ’s Atonement.” In Tracing Ancient Threads in the Book of Moses: Inspired Origins, Temple Contexts, and Literary Qualities, Volume 1. Edited by Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, David R. Seely, John W. Welch and Scott Gordon, 1–50. Orem, UT; Springville, UT; Redding, CA; Tooele, UT: The Interpreter Foundation, Book of Mormon Central, FAIR, and Eborn Books, 2021.
Hoskisson, Paul Y. “Additional Janus Parallels in the Book of Mormon.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 47 (2021): 81-90.

Abstract: A little more than 40 years ago, Cyrus Gordon discovered and described for the first time an ancient literary technique which he had found in the Hebrew Bible, and he gave it a name — a Janus parallel. That is why no one, more than 40 years ago, could have faked a Hebrew Janus parallel in an English translation of an ancient document. But, as I reasoned, if Janus parallels were a Hebrew literary device at the time Lehi left Jerusalem (for an analog see chiasmus), then such parallels probably can be found in the Book of Mormon. In this article I describe the technical methodology for discovering Janus parallels in an English translation, and I provide two new examples.


Horne, Dennis B. “Additional Witnesses of the Coming Forth and Content of the Book of Mormon.” The Interpreter Foundation website. April 20, 2016.
Anderson, Rick. “Addressing Prickly Issues.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 23 (2017): 253-261.

Review of A Reason for Faith: Navigating LDS Doctrine & Church History, ed. Laura Harris Hales. Salt Lake City: Deseret Book; Provo, UT: BYU Religious Studies Center, 2016. 264 pp. $24.99.

Abstract: This collection of essays conveniently assembles faithful and rigorous treatments of difficult questions related to LDS history and doctrine. While two or three of the essays are sufficiently flawed to give cause for concern and while some of its arguments have been expressed differently in earlier publications, overall this book can be confidently recommended to interested and doctrinally mature Latter-day Saints.

Smoot, Stephen O. “Admonitions from General Conference to Defend the Church.” The Interpreter Foundation website. July 1, 2013.
LDS Perspectives. “Adventures in Religious Education with Casey Paul Griffeths.” The Interpreter Foundation website. August 16, 2017.
Addams, R. Jean. “Aftermath of the Martyrdom: The Aspirants to the Mantle of Joseph Smith and the Leadership of Brigham Young in the Months Following the Martyrdom.” “A Life Lived in Crescendo” Firesides. The Interpreter Foundation YouTube channel. November 28, 2021.

Feelings of foreboding were experienced by some members of the Quorum of the Twelve while serving missions in the northeastern states on June 27, 1844, the day the Prophet Joseph Smith and his brother Hyrum were assassinated. Their promptings led them to return to Nauvoo in haste. We will discuss Sidney Rigdon’s efforts to assume guardianship of the Church in August 1844 and Brigham Young’s resounding response. Then, we will explore the various claims and results of efforts by several aspirants to claim the mantle of the deceased Prophet Joseph. Next, we will examine the solidifying influence of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, led by their president Brigham Young. Finally, I will recount the resulting exodus of the majority of the Saints from western Illinois to Iowa in early 1846. Young continued to deal with the “scattering” of certain individuals and their adherents for several more years and was required to provide the counsel and direction to those apostles that were assigned to facilitate the trek westward from Kanesville in the years that followed.

Perego, Ugo A. “All Abraham’s Children: A Genetic Perspective.” Paper presented at the 2016 Science & Mormonism Symposium: Body, Brain, Mind & Spirit. March 12, 2016.
Peterson, Daniel C. “‘All Can Partake, Freely’” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 42 (2021): vii-xiv.

Abstract: The Interpreter Foundation welcomes faithful ideas, insights, and manuscripts from people of all backgrounds. In this brief essay, I share some that were recently shared with me regarding Lehi’s vision of the tree of life, as recorded in 1 Nephi 8. Among other things, Lehi seems to have been shown that the divine offer of salvation extends far beyond a small elite. As Peter exclaims in the King James rendering of Acts 10:34, “God is no respecter of persons.” Other translations render the same words as saying that he doesn’t “play favorites” or “show partiality.” The passage in James 1:5 with which the Restoration commenced clearly announces that, if they will simply ask, God “giveth to all men liberally.”.

Interpreter Foundation. “All D&C Lessons Scripture Roundtables Available.” The Interpreter Foundation website. January 12, 2017.
Esplin, Ronald K. “‘All the Measures of Joseph’ – Keys and Continuity in the Succession of 1844.” “A Life Lived in Crescendo” Firesides. The Interpreter Foundation YouTube channel. October 31, 2021.

Joseph Smith well understood that Nauvoo provided his final opportunity to finish the foundation of the Restoration and complete the mission he had been given. He also knew that his time would be short for “according to his prayers God had appointed him elsewhere”— and others would finish the work he had begun.

It is not surprising then, in retrospect, that he wasted no time once a majority of the Twelve had returned to Nauvoo from Britain, now proven as a successful administrative and leadership quorum, to put them in the harness in new ways. Unwilling to wait until October conference, Joseph called a “special conference” in August 1841, the month following their return, to announce to the saints that the Quorum of the Twelve apostles would have enlarged responsibilities, overseeing with the First Presidency the entire church, rather than being restricted to carrying the gospel abroad, outside the stakes, as before. “Business of the Church given to the 12,” noted Willard Richard in his diary about this event that portended important future developments. From that point forward, Young and his fellow apostles were involved in all aspects of church governance and development. They were at Joseph’s side both publicly and in private, from the first temple-related ordinances in May 1842 through administration of additional ordinances and organization of the Council of Fifty in 1844.

This presentation offers an overview of how these new assignments, responsibilities and opportunities prepared Brigham Young and the Quorum of the Twelve to “carry the burden in the heat of the day,” even in Joseph’s absence. It will show that Joseph saw to them receiving “every key and every power that he ever held himself before God,“ preparing them and fully empowering them to, as they proclaimed, “carry out all the measures of Joseph”—to complete on the foundation he laid the edifice he had envisioned and begun.

Swift, Hales. “All We Can/Could Do Is Repentance (Alma 24).” The Interpreter Foundation website. June 29, 2020.
Swift, Hales. “An Allegory of the Olive Tree Potpourri – Some Notes on Jacob 5.” The Interpreter Foundation website. March 26, 2020.
Swift, Hales. “Alma 36: Christ as Turning Point.” The Interpreter Foundation website. July 20, 2020.
Swift, Hales. “Alma 44: Just and Unjust War, Simile Curses, and Repentance.” The Interpreter Foundation website. August 11, 2020.
Swift, Hales. “Alma 55:4-9: Nephite and Lamanite Differences More about Sound than Look.” The Interpreter Foundation website. August 11, 2020.
Bowen, Matthew L. “Alma — Young Man, Hidden Prophet.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 19 (2016): 343-353.

Abstract: The biographical introduction of Alma the Elder into the Book of Mormon narrative (Mosiah 17:2) also introduces the name Alma into the text for the first time, this in close juxtaposition with a description of Alma as a “young man.” The best explanation for the name Alma is that it derives from the Semitic term ǵlm (Hebrew ʿelem), “young man,” “youth,” “lad.” This suggests the strong probability of an intentional wordplay on the name Alma in the Book of Mormon’s underlying text: Alma became “[God’s] young man” or “servant.” Additional lexical connections between Mosiah 17:2 and Mosiah 14:1 (quoting Isaiah 53:1) suggest that Abinadi identified Alma as the one “to whom” or “upon whom” (ʿal-mî) the Lord was “reveal[ing]” his arm as Abinadi’s prophetic successor. Alma began his prophetic succession when he “believed” Abinadi’s report and pled with King Noah for Abinadi’s life. Forced to flee, Alma began his prophetic ministry “hidden” and “concealed” while writing the words of Abinadi and teaching them “privately.” The narrative’s dramatic emphasis on this aspect of Alma’s life suggests an additional thread of wordplay that exploits the homonymy between Alma and the Hebrew root *ʿlm, forms of which mean “to hide,” “conceal,” “be hidden,” “be concealed.” The richness of the wordplay and allusion revolving around Alma’s name in Mosiah 17–18 accentuates his importance as a prophetic figure and founder of the later Nephite church. Moreover, it suggests that Alma’s name was appropriate given the details of his life and that he lived up to the positive connotations latent in his name.

Brown, Amanda Colleen. “Alma’s Reality: Reading Alma as Sinful, Repentant, Traumatized, Questioning, and Righteous.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 46 (2021): 249-252.

Review of Kylie Nielson Turley, Alma 1–29: A Brief Theological Introduction (Provo, UT: The Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship, 2020). 162 pages. $9.95 (paperback).

Abstract: Kylie Nielson Turley delves deep into the conversion and ministry of Alma the Younger, reading new life into a well-known narrative. By analyzing Alma’s story with the full weight of his humanity in mind, she breathes emotion into Alma’s conversion and missionary efforts. Her efforts to read Alma without a veneer of superhumanity result in a highly relatable figure who has known wickedness, repentance, loss, depression, and righteousness.

Swift, Hales. “Alma’s Testimony of Christ’s Birth and Mission (Alma 7).” The Interpreter Foundation website. June 1, 2020.
Robertson, John S. “An American Indian Language Family with Middle Eastern Loanwords: Responding to A Recent Critique.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 34 (2020): 1-16.

Abstract: In 2015 Brian Stubbs published a landmark book, demonstrating that Uto-Aztecan, an American Indian language family, contains a vast number of Northwest Semitic and Egyptian loanwords spoken in the first millennium bc. Unlike other similar claims — absurd, eccentric, and without substance — Stubbs’s book is a serious, linguistically based study that deserves serious consideration. In the scholarly world, any claim of Old World influence in the New World languages is met with critical, often hostile skepticism. This essay is written in response to one such criticism.

McMurtry, Benjamin. “The Amlicites and Amalekites: Are They the Same People?” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 25 (2017): 269-281.

Abstract: Royal Skousen’s Book of Mormon Critical Text Project has proposed many hundreds of changes to the text of the Book of Mormon. A subset of these changes does not come from definitive evidence found in the manuscripts or printed editions but are conjectural emendations. In this paper, I examine one of these proposed changes — the merging of two dissenting Nephite groups, the Amlicites and the Amalekites. Carefully examining the timeline and geography of these groups shows logical problems with their being the same people. This paper argues that they are, indeed, separate groups and explores a plausible explanation for the missing origins of the Amalekites.

Boyce, Duane. “The Ammonites Were Not Pacifists.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 20 (2016): 293-313.

Abstract: Although it is common to believe that the Ammonites were pacifists, the report of their story demonstrates that this is a mistake. Appreciating the Ammonites’ non-pacifism helps us think more clearly about them, and it also explains several features of the text. These are textual elements that surprise us if we assume that the Ammonites were pacifists, but that make perfect sense once we understand that they were not. Moreover, in addition to telling us that the Ammonites were not pacifists, the text also gives us the actual reason the Ammonites came to eschew all conflict — and we learn from this why significant prophetic leaders (from King Benjamin to Alma to Mormon) did not reject the sword in the same way. The text also reveals the intellectual flaw in supposing that the Ammonites’ early acts of self-sacrifice set the proper example for all disciples to follow.

Interpreter Foundation. “Amy L. Williams on ‘Answering New Atheism and Seeking a Sure Knowledge of God’” The Interpreter Foundation website. November 30, 2014.
Skousen, Royal. Analysis of Textual Variants of the Book of Mormon Part Five: Alma 56 – 3 Nephi 18. Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies, 2008.

The version available here online at Interpreter: A Journal of Mormon Scripture is a reproduction of the

printed version of ATV, published in 2004–2009 by the Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon

Studies, now a part of the Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship at Brigham Young University.

No textual adjustments to the printed version have been made.

Skousen, Royal. Analysis of Textual Variants of the Book of Mormon Part Four: Alma 21–55. Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies, 2007.

The version available here online at Interpreter: A Journal of Mormon Scripture is a reproduction of the

printed version of ATV, published in 2004–2009 by the Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon

Studies, now a part of the Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship at Brigham Young University.

No textual adjustments to the printed version have been made.

Skousen, Royal. Analysis of Textual Variants of the Book of Mormon Part One: 1 Nephi 1 – 2 Nephi 10. Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies, 2004.

The version available here online at Interpreter: A Journal of Mormon Scripture is a reproduction of the

printed version of ATV, published in 2004–2009 by the Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon

Studies, now a part of the Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship at Brigham Young University.

No textual adjustments to the printed version have been made.

ATV appears in six books and gives a complete analysis of all the important cases of textual variation

(or potential variation) in the history of the Book of Mormon. It starts out with the title page of the Book

of Mormon and the two witness statements, then turns to 1 Nephi and continues through the Book of

Mormon to the end of Moroni.

Skousen, Royal. Analysis of Textual Variants of the Book of Mormon Part Six: 3 Nephi 19 – Moroni 10. Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies, 2009.

The version available here online at Interpreter: A Journal of Mormon Scripture is a reproduction of the

printed version of ATV, published in 2004–2009 by the Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon

Studies, now a part of the Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship at Brigham Young University.

No textual adjustments to the printed version have been made.

ATV appears in six books and gives a complete analysis of all the important cases of textual variation

(or potential variation) in the history of the Book of Mormon. It starts out with the title page of the Book

of Mormon and the two witness statements, then turns to 1 Nephi and continues through the Book of

Mormon to the end of Moroni.

Skousen, Royal. Analysis of Textual Variants of the Book of Mormon Part Three: Mosiah 17 – Alma 20. Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies, 2006.

The version available here online at Interpreter: A Journal of Mormon Scripture is a reproduction of the

printed version of ATV, published in 2004–2009 by the Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon

Studies, now a part of the Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship at Brigham Young University.

No textual adjustments to the printed version have been made.

ATV appears in six books and gives a complete analysis of all the important cases of textual variation

(or potential variation) in the history of the Book of Mormon. It starts out with the title page of the Book

of Mormon and the two witness statements, then turns to 1 Nephi and continues through the Book of

Mormon to the end of Moroni.

Skousen, Royal. Analysis of Textual Variants of the Book of Mormon Part Two: 2 Nephi 11 – Mosiah 16. Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies, 2005.

The version available here online at Interpreter: A Journal of Mormon Scripture is a reproduction of the

printed version of ATV, published in 2004–2009 by the Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon

Studies, now a part of the Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship at Brigham Young University.

No textual adjustments to the printed version have been made.

ATV appears in six books and gives a complete analysis of all the important cases of textual variation

(or potential variation) in the history of the Book of Mormon. It starts out with the title page of the Book

of Mormon and the two witness statements, then turns to 1 Nephi and continues through the Book of

Mormon to the end of Moroni.

Bradshaw, Jeffrey M., and David J. Larsen. “Ancient Affinities within the LDS Book of Enoch Part One.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 4 (2013): 1-27.

Abstract: In this article, we will examine affinities between ancient extracanonical sources and a collection of modern revelations that Joseph Smith termed “extracts from the Prophecy of Enoch.” We build on the work of previous scholars, revisiting their findings with the benefit of subsequent scholarship. Following a perspective on the LDS canon and an introduction to the LDS Enoch revelations, we will focus on relevant passages in pseudepigrapha and LDS scripture within three episodes in the Mormon Enoch narrative: Enoch’s prophetic commission, Enoch’s encounters with the “gibborim,” and the weeping and exaltation of Enoch and his people.

Bradshaw, Jeffrey M., and David J. Larsen. “Ancient Affinities within the LDS Book of Enoch Part Two.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 4 (2013): 29-74.

Abstract: In this article, we will examine affinities between ancient extracanonical sources and a collection of modern revelations that Joseph Smith termed “extracts from the Prophecy of Enoch.” We build on the work of previous scholars, revisiting their findings with the benefit of subsequent scholarship. Following a perspective on the LDS canon and an introduction to the LDS Enoch revelations, we will focus on relevant passages in pseudepigrapha and LDS scripture within three episodes in the Mormon Enoch narrative: Enoch’s prophetic commission, Enoch’s encounters with the “gibborim,” and the weeping and exaltation of Enoch and his people.

Muhlestein, Kerry. “Ancient Egypt’s Temples, and Parallels by Kerry Muhlestein (Egypt lecture #5).” The Ultimate Egypt – Interpreter Foundation Tour Lecture. The Interpreter Foundation website. September 29, 2021.

Egypt built temples for thousands of years. The largest religious buildings ever built were temples in Egypt, and the largest room in any religious structure is the hypostyle hall in the Karnak Temple. Additionally, no one mastered and used symbolism like the Egyptians. Come explore the purpose of Egyptian temples and see how it can deepen your understanding of religious symbols in modern-day usage as well.

Smith, Daniel. “The Ancient Israelite Tabernacle, Its Accoutrements, and the Priestly Vestments.” Paper presented at the 2016 Temple on Mount Zion Conference. November 5, 2016.
Parry, Donald W. “Ancient Sacred Vestments: Scriptural Symbols and Meanings.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 48 (2021): 11-32.

Abstract: In this essay Parry starts with the symbology of ritual vestments, and then discusses in detail how the ancient clothing worn in Old Testament temples are part of the rituals and religious gestures that are conducted by those who occupy the path that leads from the profane to the sacred. The profane is removed, one is ritually washed, anointed, invested with special clothing, offers sacrifices, is ordained (hands are filled), and offers incense at the altar, before entering the veil. Putting on clothes, in a Christian context, is often seen as symbol of putting on Christ, as witnessed by the apostle Paul using the word “enduo,” when talking about putting on Christ, a word mainly used in the Septuagint for donning sacred vestments (symbols also for salvation, righteousness, glory, strength and resurrection) in order to be prepared to stand before God. Parry then goes on explaining how priestly officiants wearing sacred vestments, emulated celestial persons who wear sacred vestments, making one an image of those celestial persons. He concludes with showing how the ancient garbs of the High Priest point to Christ.


[Editor’s Note: Part of our book chapter reprint series, this article is reprinted here as a service to the LDS community. Original pagination and page numbers have necessarily changed, otherwise the reprint has the same content as the original.

See Donald W. Parry, “Ancient Sacred Vestments: Scriptural Symbols and Meanings,” in Temple Insights: Proceedings of the Interpreter Matthew B. Brown Memorial Conference, “The Temple on Mount Zion,” 22 September 2012, ed. William J. Hamblin and David Rolph Seely (Orem, UT: The Interpreter Foundation; Salt Lake City: Eborn Books, 2014), 219–40. [Page 12]Further information at https://interpreterfoundation.org/books/temple-insights/.]

Riddick, Jared. “An Ancient Survival Guide: John Bytheway’s Look at Moroni.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 30 (2018): 1-4.

Abstract: Moroni’s years of wandering alone after the battle of Cumorah have been often discussed, but not in the context of how they impacted his writing and editorial work. John Bytheway’s latest offering provides us insight into the man Moroni and how his isolation impacted the material that he left for his latter-day readers.

Review of John Bytheway, Moroni’s Guide to Surviving Turbulent Times. (Salt Lake City: Deseret Book, 2017). 159 pp., $11.99.

Bokovoy, David E. “Ancient Temple Imagery in the Sermons of Jacob.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 46 (2021): 31-46.

Abstract: This essay makes a compelling argument for Jacob, the brother of Nephi, having deep knowledge of ancient Israelite temple ritual, concepts, and imagery, based on two of Jacob’s sermons in 2 Nephi 9 and Jacob 1-3. For instance, he discusses the duty of the priest to expiate sin and make atonement before the Lord and of entering God’s presence. Jacob quotes temple-related verses from the Old Testament, like Psalm 95. The allusions to the temple are not forced, but very subtle. Of course, Jacob’s central topic, the atonement, is a temple topic itself, and its opposite, impurity, is also expressed by Jacob in terms familiar and central to an ancient temple priest. The temple is also shown as a gate to heaven.

[Editor’s Note: Part of our book chapter reprint series, this article is reprinted here as a service to the LDS community. Original pagination and page numbers have necessarily changed, otherwise the reprint has the same content as the original.

See David E. Bokovoy, “Ancient Temple Imagery in the Sermons of Jacob,” in Temple Insights: Proceedings of the Interpreter Matthew B. Brown Memorial Conference, “The Temple on Mount Zion,” 22 September 2012, ed. William J. Hamblin and David Rolph Seely (Orem, UT: The Interpreter Foundation; Salt Lake City: Eborn Books, 2014), 171–186. Further information at https://interpreterfoundation.org/books/temple-insights/.].

Interpreter Foundation. “Ancient Temple Themes in the Book of Mormon.” The Interpreter Foundation website. December 28, 2013.
Brown, Matthew B., Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, Stephen D. Ricks, and John S. Thompson, eds. Ancient Temple Worship: Proceedings of the Expound Symposium, 14 May 2011. Temple on Mount Zion 1. Orem and Salt Lake City, UT: The Interpreter Foundation and Eborn Books, 2014.

The first volume in a series by Eborn Books and The Interpreter Foundation. The second title in this series is TEMPLE INSIGHTS. The Interpreter Foundation is a new organization, much like FARMS [The Foundation of Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.] Contributors and Chapters: 1. Cube, Gate and Measuring Tools: A Biblical Pattern, by Matthew B. Brown. 2. The Tabernacle: Mountain of God in the Cultus of Israel, by L. Michael Morales. 3. Standing in the Holy Place: Ancient and Modern Reverberations, by Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. 4. Understanding Ritual Hand Gestures of the Ancient World, by David Calabro. 5. The Sacred Embrace and the Sacred Handclasp, by Stephen D. Ricks. 6. Ascending into the Hill of the Lord: What the Psalms Can Tell Us, by David J. Larsen. 7. The Sod of YHWH and the Endowment, by William J. Hamblin. 8. Temples All the Way Down: Notes on the Mi\'raj of Muhammad, by Daniel C. Peterson. 9. The Lady at the Horizon: Egyptian Tree Goddess Iconography, by John S. Thompson. 10. Nephite Daykeepers: Ritual Specialists in Mesoamerica, by Mark Alan Wright. 11. Is Decrypting the Genetic Legacy of America\'s Indigenous Populations Key to the Historicity of the Book of Mormon? by Ugo A. Perego and Jayne E. Ekins.

Interpreter Foundation. “Ancient Temples and Sacred Symbolism Video.” The Interpreter Foundation website. September 3, 2012.
Bowen, Matthew L. “‘And the Meek Also Shall Increase’: The Verb yāsap in Isaiah 29 and Nephi’s Prophetic Allusions to the Name Joseph in 2 Nephi 25–30.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 30 (2018): 5-42.

Abstract: Beyond his autobiographic use of Joseph’s name and biography, Nephi also considered the name Joseph to have long-term prophetic value. As a Semitic/Hebrew name, Joseph derives from the verb yāsap (to “add,” “increase,” “proceed to do something,” “do something again,” and to “do something more”), thus meaning “may he [God] add,” “may he increase,” or “may he do more/again.” Several of the prophecies of Isaiah, in which Nephi’s soul delighted and for which he offers extensive interpretation, prominently employ forms of yāsap in describing iterative and restorative divine action (e.g., Isaiah 11:11; 26:15; 29:14; cf. 52:1). The prophecy of the coming forth of the sealed book in Isaiah 29 employs the latter verb three times (Isaiah 29:1, 14, and 19). Nephi’s extensive midrash of Isaiah 29 in 2 Nephi 25–30 (especially 2 Nephi 27) interpretively expands Isaiah’s use of the yāsap idiom(s). Time and again, Nephi returns to the language of Isaiah 29:14 (“I will proceed [yôsīp] to do a marvelous work”), along with a similar yāsap-idiom from Isaiah 11:11 (“the Lord shall set his hand again [yôsîp] … to recover the remnant of his people”) to foretell the Latter-day forthcoming of the sealed book to fulfill the Lord’s ancient promises to the patriarch. Given Nephi’s earlier preservation of Joseph’s prophecies regarding a future seer named “Joseph,” we can reasonably see Nephi’s emphasis on iterative divine action in his appropriation of the Isaianic use of yāsap as a direct and thematic allusion to this latter-day “Joseph” and his role in bringing forth additional scripture. This additional scripture would enable the meek to “increase,” just as Isaiah and Nephi had prophesied. “May [God] Add”/“May He Increase”.

Spendlove, Loren Blake. “And the One Pointed the Way: Issues of Interpretation and Translation Involving the Liahona.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 45 (2021): 1-36.

Abstract: In describing the operation of the spindles in the Liahona, Nephi’s statement that “the one pointed the way” in 1 Nephi 16:10 is frequently taken to mean that one of the two spindles indicated the direction to travel. However, Nephi’s apparent use of the Hebrew word האחד (ha’echad)

may imply a different mechanism in which the direction was being shown when both operated as one. If so, there may be added symbolism of unity and oneness inherent in Nephi’s and Alma’s descriptions of the Liahona. Additionally, I provide a detailed analysis of words and phrases used by Nephi and Alma to describe the Liahona which potentially reveal intriguing Hebrew wordplay in the text.

Larsen, David J. “‘And There Are Many Kingdoms’: D&C 88 and the Hierarchy of Kingdoms.” The Interpreter Foundation website. September 20, 2013.
Bowen, Matthew L. “‘And There Wrestled a Man with Him’ (Genesis 32:24): Enos’s Adaptations of the Onomastic Wordplay of Genesis.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 10 (2014): 151-160.

Abstract: In this brief note, I will suggest several instances in which the Book of Mormon prophet Enos utilizes wordplay on his own name, the name of his father “Jacob,” the place name “Peniel,” and Jacob’s new name “Israel” in order to connect his experiences to those of his ancestor Jacob in Genesis 32-33, thus infusing them with greater meaning. Familiarity with Jacob and Esau’s conciliatory “embrace” in Genesis 33 is essential to understanding how Enos views the atonement of Christ and the ultimate realization of its blessings in his life.

Bowen, Matthew L. “‘And They Shall Be Had Again’: Onomastic Allusions to Joseph in Moses 1:41 in View of the So-called Canon Formula.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 32 (2019): 297-304.

Abstract: Moses 1:41 echoes or plays on the etymological meaning of the name Joseph — “may he [Yahweh] add,” as the Lord foretells to Moses the raising up of a future figure through whom the Lord’s words, after having been “taken” (away) from the book that Moses would write, “shall be had again among the children of men.” Moses 1:41 anticipates and employs language reminiscent of the so-called biblical canon formulas, possible additions to biblical texts meant to ensure the texts’ stability by warning against “adding” or “diminishing” (i.e., “taking away”) from them (e.g., Deuteronomy 4:2; 5:22 [MT 5:18]; 12:32 [MT 13:1]; cf. Revelation 22:18– 19). This article presupposes that the vision of Moses presents restored text that was at some point recorded in Hebrew.

Interpreter Foundation. “Andrew Ehat on ‘A Torah Harmony’” The Interpreter Foundation website. February 16, 2015.
Miller, Wade E. “Animals in the Book of Mormon: Challenges and Perspectives.” The Interpreter Foundation website. April 21, 2014.
Interpreter Foundation. “Ann Madsen on ‘Temples in the Margins: The Temple in Isaiah’” The Interpreter Foundation website. June 4, 2015.
Interpreter Foundation. “Announcement regarding Church website.” The Interpreter Foundation website. July 29, 2017.
Interpreter Foundation. “Announcement: The Lady of the Temple Symposium.” The Interpreter Foundation website. July 11, 2013.
Interpreter Foundation. “Announcing a Book Signing and Discussion.” The Interpreter Foundation website. June 9, 2016.
Interpreter Foundation. “Announcing a Conference: Exploring the Complexities in the English Language of the Book of Mormon.” The Interpreter Foundation website. February 16, 2015.
Interpreter Foundation. “Announcing a Fireside with Dr. Andrew Skinner.” The Interpreter Foundation website. June 25, 2014.
Interpreter Foundation. “Announcing a ‘Come, Follow Me’ Virtual Fireside Series — ‘A Life Lived in Crescendo’” The Interpreter Foundation website. June 19, 2021.
Interpreter Foundation. “Announcing Daniel C. Peterson’s Summerhays Lecture.” The Interpreter Foundation website. September 11, 2013.
Interpreter Foundation. “Announcing Science & Mormonism: Cosmos, Earth & Man Symposium.” The Interpreter Foundation website. July 23, 2013.
Peterson, Daniel C. “Announcing Special Screenings of ‘Witnesses’ During BYU Education Week.” The Interpreter Foundation website. August 11, 2021.
Interpreter Foundation. “Announcing The Interpreter Foundation Ultimate Egypt Tour Lecture Series.” The Interpreter Foundation website. July 30, 2021.
Interpreter Foundation. “Announcing the Maori-Mormon Symposium.” The Interpreter Foundation website. November 2, 2014.
Interpreter Foundation. “Announcing the Online Edition of Royal Skousen’s Analysis of Textual Variants of the Book of Mormon.” The Interpreter Foundation website. October 7, 2014.
Interpreter Foundation. “Announcing the Publication of Enoch and the Temple E-Book.” The Interpreter Foundation website. April 17, 2014.
Interpreter Foundation. “Announcing the Second Temple on Mount Zion Conference.” The Interpreter Foundation website. July 31, 2014.
Interpreter Foundation. “Annual Subscription of Interpreter Journal Paperback Volumes Now Available.” The Interpreter Foundation website. July 6, 2013.
Skousen, Royal. “Another Account of Mary Whitmer’s Viewing of the Golden Plates.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 10 (2014): 35-44.

Carl T. Cox has graciously provided me with a new account of Moroni showing the Book of Mormon plates to Mary Whitmer (1778-1856), wife of Peter Whitmer Senior. Mary was the mother of five sons who were witnesses to the golden plates: David Whitmer, one of the three witnesses; and Christian Whitmer, Jacob Whitmer, John Whitmer, and Peter Whitmer Junior, four of the eight witnesses.

For a long time we have known that Mary Whitmer was also shown the plates. These accounts are familiar and derive from David Whitmer and John C. Whitmer (the son of John Whitmer). For comparison’s sake, I provide here two versions of their accounts (in each case, I have added some paragraphing).

Gardner, Brant A. “Another Suggestion for Reading 1 Nephi 1: 1-3.” The Interpreter Foundation website. January 18, 2014.
Williams, Amy L. “Answering New Atheism and Seeking a Sure Knowledge of God.” Paper presented at The 2013 Interpreter Symposium on Science & Mormonism: Cosmos, Earth & Man. November 9, 2013.
Interpreter Foundation. “Answering New Atheism and Seeking a Sure Knowledge of God.” The Interpreter Foundation website. November 25, 2019.
Stubbs, Brian D. “Answering the Critics in 44 Rebuttal Points.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 37 (2020): 237-292.

Abstract: After publishing several articles in peer-reviewed journals, the author published Uto-Aztecan: A Comparative Vocabulary (2011), the new standard in comparative Uto-Aztecan, favorably reviewed and heartily welcomed by specialists in the field. Four years later, another large reference work, Exploring the Explanatory Power of Semitic and Egyptian in Uto-Aztecan (2015), was also favorably reviewed but not as joyfully welcomed among specialists as its predecessor. While some saw it as sound, more were silent. Some disliked the topic, but no one produced substantive refutations of it. In August 2019, Chris Rogers published a review, but John S. Robertson’s response to Rogers’s review and my response in the first 24 items rebutted below shed new light on his criticisms. Following on the heels of Rogers’s review, Magnus Pharao Hansen, specializing in Nahuatl, blogged objections to 14 Nahuatl items among the 1,528 sets. Rogers’s and Hansen’s articles gave rise to some critical commentary as well as to a few valid questions. What follows clarifies the misconceptions in Rogers’s review, responds to Hansen’s Nahuatl issues, and answers some reasonable questions raised by others.

Editor’s Note: Critics of the Book of Mormon often argue that no evidence exists for contact between the ancient Near East and the Americas. Accordingly, proof of such contact would demolish a principal objection to Joseph Smith’s prophetic claims. If the thesis of Brian Stubbs’s works is correct, he has furnished precisely that proof. As might be expected, Stubbs’s efforts have drawn criticism from some, but not all, of his linguistic peers. This article represents a response by Stubbs to those criticisms. Stubbs’s works are admittedly complex and highly technical. They are, therefore, difficult, and it can take quite a bit of work for a reader to assimilate and understand the implications of his arguments. That very complexity and difficulty, though, precludes dismissal of Stubbs’s works out of hand. Has Stubbs proved the Book of Mormon true? No, but his data suggest that speakers of both Egyptian and a Semitic language came into contact with Uto-Aztecan speakers at roughly the same time as Book of Mormon events purportedly occurred and that a distinct Semitic infusion occurred at a different point. Stubbs’s work is important and it deserves careful, reasoned consideration by scholars and lay readers alike.

LDS Perspectives. “The Apocrypha with Jared Ludlow.” The Interpreter Foundation website. October 24, 2018.
Gee, John. “The Apocryphal Acts of Jesus.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 2 (2012): 145-187.

Abstract: Numerous noncanonical accounts of Jesus’s deeds exist. While some Latter-day Saints would like to find plain and precious things in the apocryphal accounts, few are to be found. Three types of accounts deal with Jesus as a child, his mortal ministry, or after his resurrection. The Jesus of the infancy gospels does not act like the Jesus of the real gospels. The apocryphal accounts of Jesus’s ministry usually push a particular theological agenda. The accounts of Jesus’s post-resurrection teaching often contain intriguing but bizarre information. On the whole, apocryphal accounts of Jesus’s ministry probably contain less useful information for Latter-day Saints than they might expect.

Hamblin, William J. “The Apologetics of Richness?” The Interpreter Foundation website. March 28, 2013.
Thompson, A. Keith. “Apostate Religion in the Book of Mormon.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 25 (2017): 191-226.

Abstract: Nephite missionaries in the first century BC had significant difficulty preaching the gospel among Nephites and Lamanites who followed Zoramite and Nehorite teaching. Both of these groups built synagogues and other places of worship suggesting that some of their beliefs originated in Israelite practice, but both denied the coming or the necessity of a Messiah. This article explores the nature of Zoramite and Nehorite beliefs, identifies how their beliefs and practices differed from orthodox Nephite teaching, and suggests that some of these religious differences are attributable to cultural and political differences that resonate in the present

Swift, Hales. “The Application of the Law of Witnesses in 2 Nephi 27 and 28.” The Interpreter Foundation website. February 24, 2020.
Wyatt, Allen L. “An Approach to History.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 31 (2019): 277-284.

Abstract: When researching and evaluating historical information, it is easy to come across things that may lead to a crisis of faith. Some of those crises may lead individuals to leave the Church and actively proselytize against it. It is much better when dealing with historical issues to approach them from a standpoint of charity, treating historical figures as we would like to be treated.

Parry, Donald W. “An Approach to Isaiah Studies.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 34 (2020): 245-264.

Review of Joseph M. Spencer, The Vision of All: Twenty-Five Lectures on Isaiah in Nephi’s Record (Salt Lake City: Greg Kofford Books, 2016). 318 pages. $59.95 (hardback); $29.95 paperback.

Abstract: This review makes a case, briefly, for the unmistakable presence of Jesus Christ in Isaiah’s text, which case is based on a corpus linguistic-based description of the Hebrew Bible, equivalent designations of deific names, self-identification declarations by the Lord, and more. And, importantly, one can never set aside the multiple teachings and testimonies of our modern prophets and apostles regarding Isaiah’s prophecies of Jesus Christ. Moreover, in my view, a knowledge of biblical Hebrew helps us to penetrate the very depths and heights of Isaiah’s text.

Smoot, Stephen O. “Approaching Abinadi.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 28 (2018): 257-260.

Abstract: The recently released Abinadi: He Came Among Them in Disguise, a new book from Brigham Young University’s Book of Mormon Academy, offers readers multidisciplinary approaches to Mosiah 11–17 that highlight the literary, historical, and doctrinal richness of the story of Abinadi. Students and scholars of the Book of Mormon are sure to benefit greatly from this new volume.

Review of Shon D. Hopkin, ed. Abinadi: He Came Among Them in Disguise (Provo and Salt Lake City: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, and Deseret Book, 2018), 404 pp. $27.99.

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Riley, Jonathon. “Archaism or Translation Technique?: Hebraisms in the Book of Moses.” Presented at the conference entitled “Tracing Ancient Threads of the Book of Moses” (April 23-24, 2021), Provo, UT: Brigham Young University 2021.
Hamblin, William J. “Are Mormons Christians? Witherington says no.” The Interpreter Foundation website. August 28, 2012.
Swift, Hales. “Are Ordinances No Longer a Thing? (Colossians 2).” The Interpreter Foundation website. October 12, 2019.
Lindsay, Jeff. “‘Arise from the Dust’: Insights from Dust-Related Themes in the Book of Mormon (Part 1: Tracks from the Book of Moses).” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 22 (2016): 179-232.

Abstract: In light of Noel Reynolds’ hypothesis that some material in the Book of Moses may have been present on the brass plates that Nephi used, one may wonder if Nephi or other authors might also have drawn upon the use of chains in the Book of Moses, particularly Satan’s “great chain [that] veiled … the earth with darkness” (Moses 7:26) and the “chains of darkness” (Moses 7:57). Though the phrase “chains of darkness” is not used in the Book of Mormon, 2 Nephi 1:23, quoting Lehi, combines chains and obscurity, where obscurity can have the meaning of darkness. In fact, there may be a Hebraic wordplay behind Lehi’s words when he tells his wayward sons to “come forth out of obscurity and arise from the dust,” based on the similarity between the Hebrew words for “obscurity” and “dust.” The association between dust and chains and several other newly found linkages to Book of Moses material is enriched by a study of Walter Brueggemann on the covenant-related meanings of “rising from the dust” and “returning to the dust” in the Bible, a topic we explore in Part 2.

Then, after showing how dust-related themes in the Book of Mormon can enhance our understanding of several important passages, we build on that knowledge in Part 3 to “dust off” the most famous chiasmus in the Book of Mormon, where we will show that some apparent gaps and wordy regions in the complex chiastic structure of Alma 36 are more compact and meaningful than we may have realized. Both dust-related themes and themes from the Book of Moses assist in better appreciating the richness of that masterpiece of Hebraic poetry. Overall, a small amount of exploration motivated by Reynolds’ work may have led to several interesting finds that strengthen the case for Book of Moses content on the brass plates and deepen our appreciation of the use of ancient Near Eastern dust themes in the Book of Mormon, that majestic “voice from the dust.”

Lindsay, Jeff. “‘Arise from the Dust’: Insights from Dust-Related Themes in the Book of Mormon (Part 2: Enthronement, Resurrection, and Other Ancient Motifs from the ‘Voice from the Dust’).” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 22 (2016): 233-277.

Abstract: In light of Noel Reynolds’ hypothesis that some material in the Book of Moses may have been present on the brass plates that Nephi used, one may wonder if Nephi or other authors might also have drawn upon the use of chains in the Book of Moses. Further examination of this connection points to the significance of the theme of “dust” in Lehi’s words and the surrounding passages from Nephi and Jacob, where it can involve motifs of covenant keeping, resurrection, and enthronement. Recognizing the usage of dust-related themes in the Book of Mormon can enhance our understanding of the meaning and structure of several portions of the text. An appeal to the Book of Mormon’s use of dust may also help fill in some gaps in the complex chiastic structure of Alma 36 (to be treated in Part 3) and add meaning to other portions of that “voice from the dust,” the Book of Mormon.

Lindsay, Jeff. “‘Arise from the Dust’: Insights from Dust-Related Themes in the Book of Mormon (Part 3: Dusting Off a Famous Chiasmus, Alma 36).” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 22 (2016): 295-318.

Abstract: In light of Noel Reynolds’ hypothesis that some material in the Book of Moses may have been present on the brass plates that Nephi used, exploration of concepts related to chains in the Book of Moses led to several insights involving a group of related motifs in the Book of Mormon where shaking off Satan’s chains and rising from the dust are linked, as discussed in Parts 1 and 2. Here we argue that an appeal to the Book of Mormon’s use of dust may fill in some gaps in the complex chiastic structure of Alma 36 and strengthen the case that it is a carefully crafted example of ancient Semitic poetry.

Bradshaw, Jeffrey M. “The Ark and the Tent: Temple Symbolism in the Story of Noah.” Paper presented at the 2012 Temple on Mount Zion Conference. September 22, 2012.
Bradshaw, Jeffrey M. “The Ark and the Tent: Temple Symbolism in the Story of Noah.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 44 (2021): 93-136.

Abstract: Jeffrey M. Bradshaw compares Moses’ tabernacle and Noah’s ark, and then identifies the story of Noah as a temple related drama, drawing of temple mysticism and symbols. After examining structural similarities between ark and tabernacle and bringing into the discussion further information about the Mesopotamian flood story, he shows how Noah’s ark is a beginning of a new creation, pointing out the central point of Day One in the Noah story. When Noah leaves the ark, they find themselves in a garden, not unlike the Garden of Eden in the way the Bible speaks about it. A covenant is established in signs and tokens. Noah is the new Adam. This is then followed by a fall/Judgement scene story, even though it is Ham who is judged, not Noah. In accordance with mostly non-Mormon sources quoted, Bradshaw points out how Noah was not in “his” tent, but in the tent of the Shekhina, the presence of God, how being drunk was seen by the ancients as a synonym to “being caught up in a vision of God,” and how his “nakedness” was rather referring to garments God had made for Adam and Eve.

[Editor’s Note: Part of our book chapter reprint series, this article is reprinted here as a service to the LDS community. Original pagination and page numbers have necessarily changed, otherwise the reprint has the same content as the original.

See Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, “The Ark and the Tent: Temple Symbolism in the Story of Noah,” in Temple Insights: Proceedings of the Interpreter Matthew B. Brown Memorial Conference, “The Temple on Mount Zion,” 22 September 2012, ed. William J. Hamblin and David Rolph Seely (Orem, UT: The Interpreter Foundation; Salt Lake City: Eborn Books, 2014), 25–66. Further information at https://interpreterfoundation.org/books/temple-insights/.].

Interpreter Foundation. “Articles of Faith 13: Russell Stevenson FairMormon Conference Follow Up – Coming to Grips With Brigham Young and Race.” The Interpreter Foundation website. August 19, 2014.
Larsen, David J. “Ascending into the Hill of the Lord: What the Psalms Can Tell Us About the Rituals of the First Temple.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 38 (2020): 15-34.

Abstract: In this article, the author attempts to shed light on practices alluded to in the Psalms that may have formed part of the ritual system and theology of Solomon’s original temple. He describes various aspects of the ritual system of pre-exilic Israel, including pilgrimage, questioning at the gates, epiphany, and royal rites. In the culmination of these rites, the king, who likely led the procession up to the temple, was enthorned on or beside the Lord’s own throne and transformed or “reborn” as a Son of God, appearing before the people in glorious fashion as the representative of Yahweh.

[Editor’s Note: Part of our book chapter reprint series, this article is reprinted here as a service to the LDS community. Original pagination and page numbers have necessarily changed, otherwise the reprint has the same content as the original.See David J. Larsen, “Ascending into the Hill of the Lord: What the Psalms Can Tell Us About the Rituals of the First Temple,” in Ancient Temple Worship: Proceedings of The Expound Symposium 14 May 2011, ed. Matthew B. Brown, Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, Stephen D. Ricks, and John S. Thompson (Orem, UT: The Interpreter Foundation; Salt Lake City: Eborn Books, 2014), 171–88. Further information at https://interpreterfoundation.org/books/ancient-temple-worship/.].

Foster, Craig L. “Assessing the Criticisms of Early-Age Latter-Day Saint Marriages.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 31 (2019): 191-232.

Abstract: Critics of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints have accused Joseph Smith and other early Latter-day Saint men of pedophilia because they married teenaged women. Indeed, they have emphatically declared that such marriages were against 19th-century societal norms. However, historians and other experts have repeatedly stated that young people married throughout the 19th-century, and such marriages have been relatively common throughout all of US history. This article examines some of the accusations of early Latter-day Saint pedophilia and places such marriages within the greater historical and social context, illustrating that such marriages were normal and acceptable for their time and place.

Muhlestein, Kerry. “Assessing the Joseph Smith Papyri: An Introduction to the Historiography of their Acquisitions, Translations, and Interpretations.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 22 (2016): 17-49.

Abstract: The Book of Abraham has attracted a great deal of scholarly attention since some of the papyri once owned by Joseph Smith were rediscovered. A focus of this attention has been the source of the Book of Abraham, with some contending that the extant fragments are the source, while others have argued that the source is either other papyri or something else altogether. New investigations suggest that, while the relationship between papyri and text is not clear, it is clear that the fragments are not the source and that the method of translation was not the Kirtland Egyptian Papers. Additionally, further investigations into the source of the Book of Abraham as well as the interpretations of the facsimiles have made it clear that much of the controversy about the Book of Abraham has been based on untested assumptions. Book of Abraham studies have made significant strides forward in the last few decades, while some avenues of research are in need of further pursuit.

Midgley, Louis C. “Atheist Piety: A Religion of Dogmatic Dubiety.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 1 (2012): 111-143.

Abstract: The “Special Feature” of this mass-market secular humanist magazine consists of an introduction to “America’s Peculiar Piety” followed by a miscellany of brief, nonscholarly essays critical of The Church of Jesus Christ. The questions posed in the introduction to this flagship atheist magazine go unaddressed in the essays. Some of the essays are personal exit stories by former Latter-day Saints. One is an effort by Robert M. Price to explain away the Book of Mormon without confronting its contents. This is done by ignoring the details of Joseph Smith’s career in order to picture him as the equivalent of a bizarre, emotionally conflicted figure like Charles Manson or as the embodiment of one of a wide range of mythical trickster figures like Brer Rabbit, Felix the Cat, or Doctor Who. The assumed link between these mythical or legendary figures and Joseph Smith is said to be a Jungian archetype lodged in his presumably deranged psyche, leading him to fashion the Book of Mormon.

Another essay merely mentions the well-known criticisms of Joseph Smith by Abner Cole (a.k.a. Obadiah Dogberry), while others complain that the faith of the Saints tends to meet emotional needs or that their religious community has various ways of reinforcing their own moral demands. In no instance do these authors see their own deeply held ideology as serving similar personal and community-sustaining religious functions.

All of the essays reflect a fashionable, dogmatic, naive, and deeply religious enmity toward the faith of Latter-day Saints. The essays are also shown to be instances of a modern militant atheism, which is contrasted with earlier and much less bold and aggressive doubts about divine things. The ideological links between those responsible for Free Inquiry and some critics on the fringes of the LDS community are also clearly identified.

Review of Tom Flynn et al. “America’s Peculiar Piety: Why Did Mormonism Grow? Why Does It Endure?” Free Inquiry, October/November 2011, 21–41.So then, remember that at one time you Gentiles . . . were without Christ, being aliens from the commonwealth of Israel, and strangers to the covenants of promise, having no hope and without God [atheos] in the world. (Ephesians 2:11–12 NRSV).

Hedelius, Cassandra S. “Attacking Rather Than Explaining.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 2 (2012): 1-16.

Abstract: In his book on Mormonism, the Reverend Andrew Jackson claims to explain “the teaching and practices of the LDS Church,” with an intended audience of non-Mormon Christians but also “interested Mormons.” He doesn’t succeed well. Although his presentation of Mormon history is mostly fair, his discussion of the faith of Latter-day Saints devolves into the usual anti-Mormon tropes, to which he adds a celebration of a simplified evangelical theology. What might have been a useful, straightforward account of The Church of Jesus Christ and its history ended up, instead, as a clumsy attack. Reverend Jackson eventually re-released his book under a different title as a warning against what he considers Mitt Romney’s reticence to publicly explain his faith to the Reverend’s specifications. The later iteration of Reverend Jackson’s opinions was not even revised beyond a new introduction, making plain his basic antagonistic agenda.

Review of Andrew Jackson, What Latter-day Saints Teach and Practice: Mormonism Explained, Wheaton, IL: Crossway Books [a publishing ministry of Good News Publishers], 2008. 208 pp., with four appendixes, name index, and scripture index. $29.64 (paperback).

Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Book of Mormon Lesson 1 (Title Page and Introduction).” The Interpreter Foundation website. December 14, 2019.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Book of Mormon Lesson 10 (2 Nephi 31-33).” The Interpreter Foundation website. February 29, 2020.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Book of Mormon Lesson 11 (Jacob 1-4).” The Interpreter Foundation website. March 7, 2020.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Book of Mormon Lesson 12 (Jacob 5-7).” The Interpreter Foundation website. March 10, 2020.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Book of Mormon Lesson 13 (Enos-Words of Mormon).” The Interpreter Foundation website. March 17, 2020.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Book of Mormon Lesson 14 (Easter).” The Interpreter Foundation website. March 24, 2020.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Book of Mormon Lesson 15 (Mosiah 1-3).” The Interpreter Foundation website. April 7, 2020.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Book of Mormon Lesson 16 (Mosiah 4-6).” The Interpreter Foundation website. April 14, 2020.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Book of Mormon Lesson 17 (Mosiah 7-10).” The Interpreter Foundation website. April 21, 2020.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Book of Mormon Lesson 18 (Mosiah 11-17).” The Interpreter Foundation website. April 28, 2020.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Book of Mormon Lesson 19 (Mosiah 18-24).” The Interpreter Foundation website. May 5, 2020.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Book of Mormon Lesson 2 (1 Nephi 1-7).” The Interpreter Foundation website. December 17, 2019.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Book of Mormon Lesson 20 (Mosiah 25-28).” The Interpreter Foundation website. May 12, 2020.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Book of Mormon Lesson 21 (Mosiah 29-Alma 4).” The Interpreter Foundation website. May 19, 2020.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Book of Mormon Lesson 22 (Alma 5-7).” The Interpreter Foundation website. May 26, 2020.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Book of Mormon Lesson 23 (Alma 8-12).” The Interpreter Foundation website. June 2, 2020.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Book of Mormon Lesson 24 (Alma 13-16).” The Interpreter Foundation website. June 9, 2020.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Book of Mormon Lesson 25 (Alma 17-22).” The Interpreter Foundation website. June 16, 2020.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Book of Mormon Lesson 26 (Alma 23-29).” The Interpreter Foundation website. June 23, 2020.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Book of Mormon Lesson 27 (Alma 30-31).” The Interpreter Foundation website. June 30, 2020.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Book of Mormon Lesson 28 (Alma 32-35).” The Interpreter Foundation website. July 7, 2020.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Book of Mormon Lesson 29 (Alma 36-38).” The Interpreter Foundation website. July 14, 2020.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Book of Mormon Lesson 3 (1 Nephi 8-10).” The Interpreter Foundation website. January 11, 2020.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Book of Mormon Lesson 30 (Alma 39-42).” The Interpreter Foundation website. July 21, 2020.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Book of Mormon Lesson 31 (Alma 43-52).” The Interpreter Foundation website. July 28, 2020.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Book of Mormon Lesson 32 (Alma 53-63).” The Interpreter Foundation website. August 4, 2020.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Book of Mormon Lesson 33 (Helaman 1-6).” The Interpreter Foundation website. August 11, 2020.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Book of Mormon Lesson 34 (Helaman 7-12).” The Interpreter Foundation website. August 18, 2020.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Book of Mormon Lesson 35 (Helaman 13-16).” The Interpreter Foundation website. August 25, 2020.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Book of Mormon Lesson 36 (3 Nephi 1-7).” The Interpreter Foundation website. September 1, 2020.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Book of Mormon Lesson 37 (3 Nephi 8-11).” The Interpreter Foundation website. September 8, 2020.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Book of Mormon Lesson 38 (3 Nephi 12-16).” The Interpreter Foundation website. September 15, 2020.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Book of Mormon Lesson 39 (3 Nephi 17-19).” The Interpreter Foundation website. September 22, 2020.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Book of Mormon Lesson 4 (1 Nephi 11-15).” The Interpreter Foundation website. January 18, 2020.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Book of Mormon Lesson 40 (3 Nephi 20-26).” The Interpreter Foundation website. October 6, 2020.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Book of Mormon Lesson 41 (3 Nephi 27-4 Nephi).” The Interpreter Foundation website. October 13, 2020.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Book of Mormon Lesson 42 (Mormon 1-6).” The Interpreter Foundation website. October 20, 2020.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Book of Mormon Lesson 43 (Mormon 7-9).” The Interpreter Foundation website. October 27, 2020.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Book of Mormon Lesson 44 (Ether 1-5).” The Interpreter Foundation website. October 20, 2020.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Book of Mormon Lesson 45 (Ether 6-11).” The Interpreter Foundation website. November 10, 2020.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Book of Mormon Lesson 46 (Ether 12-15).” The Interpreter Foundation website. November 17, 2020.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Book of Mormon Lesson 47 (Moroni 1-6).” The Interpreter Foundation website. November 24, 2020.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Book of Mormon Lesson 48 (Moroni 7-9).” The Interpreter Foundation website. December 1, 2020.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Book of Mormon Lesson 49 (Moroni 10).” The Interpreter Foundation website. December 8, 2020.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Book of Mormon Lesson 5 (1 Nephi 16-22).” The Interpreter Foundation website. January 25, 2020.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Book of Mormon Lesson 50 (Christmas).” The Interpreter Foundation website. December 15, 2020.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Book of Mormon Lesson 6 (2 Nephi 1-5).” The Interpreter Foundation website. February 1, 2020.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Book of Mormon Lesson 7 (2 Nephi 6-10).” The Interpreter Foundation website. February 8, 2020.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Book of Mormon Lesson 8 (2 Nephi 11-25).” The Interpreter Foundation website. February 15, 2020.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Book of Mormon Lesson 9 (2 Nephi 26-30).” The Interpreter Foundation website. February 22, 2020.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Doctrine and Covenants Lesson 1 (D&C 1).” The Interpreter Foundation website. December 22, 2020.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Doctrine and Covenants Lesson 10 (D&C 20-22).” The Interpreter Foundation website. February 23, 2021.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Doctrine and Covenants Lesson 11 (D&C 23-26).” The Interpreter Foundation website. March 2, 2021.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Doctrine and Covenants Lesson 12 (D&C 27-28).” The Interpreter Foundation website. March 9, 2021.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Doctrine and Covenants Lesson 13 (D&C 29).” The Interpreter Foundation website. March 16, 2021.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Doctrine and Covenants Lesson 14 (Easter).” The Interpreter Foundation website. March 23, 2021.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Doctrine and Covenants Lesson 15 (D&C 30-36).” The Interpreter Foundation website. March 30, 2021.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Doctrine and Covenants Lesson 16 (D&C 37-40).” The Interpreter Foundation website. April 6, 2021.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Doctrine and Covenants Lesson 17 (D&C 41-44).” The Interpreter Foundation website. April 13, 2021.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Doctrine and Covenants Lesson 18 (D&C 45).” The Interpreter Foundation website. April 20, 2021.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Doctrine and Covenants Lesson 19 (D&C 46-48).” The Interpreter Foundation website. April 27, 2021.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Doctrine and Covenants Lesson 2 (JS—History 1:1–26).” The Interpreter Foundation website. December 29, 2020.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Doctrine and Covenants Lesson 20 (D&C 49-50).” The Interpreter Foundation website. May 4, 2021.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Doctrine and Covenants Lesson 21 (D&C 51-57).” The Interpreter Foundation website. May 11, 2021.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Doctrine and Covenants Lesson 22 (D&C 58-59).” The Interpreter Foundation website. May 18, 2021.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Doctrine and Covenants Lesson 23 (D&C 60-62).” The Interpreter Foundation website. May 25, 2021.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Doctrine and Covenants Lesson 24 (D&C 63).” The Interpreter Foundation website. June 1, 2021.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Doctrine and Covenants Lesson 25 (D&C 64-66).” The Interpreter Foundation website. June 8, 2021.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Doctrine and Covenants Lesson 26 (D&C 67-70).” The Interpreter Foundation website. June 15, 2021.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Doctrine and Covenants Lesson 27 (D&C 71-75).” The Interpreter Foundation website. June 22, 2021.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Doctrine and Covenants Lesson 28 (D&C 76).” The Interpreter Foundation website. June 29, 2021.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Doctrine and Covenants Lesson 29 (D&C 77-80).” The Interpreter Foundation website. July 6, 2021.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Doctrine and Covenants Lesson 3 (D&C 2; JS—History 1:27–65).” The Interpreter Foundation website. January 5, 2021.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Doctrine and Covenants Lesson 30 (D&C 81-83).” The Interpreter Foundation website. July 13, 2021.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Doctrine and Covenants Lesson 31 (D&C 84).” The Interpreter Foundation website. July 20, 2021.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Doctrine and Covenants Lesson 32 (D&C 85-87).” The Interpreter Foundation website. July 27, 2021.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Doctrine and Covenants Lesson 33 (D&C 88).” The Interpreter Foundation website. August 3, 2021.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Doctrine and Covenants Lesson 34 (D&C 89-92).” The Interpreter Foundation website. August 10, 2021.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Doctrine and Covenants Lesson 35 (D&C 93).” The Interpreter Foundation website. August 17, 2021.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Doctrine and Covenants Lesson 36 (D&C 94-97).” The Interpreter Foundation website. August 24, 2021.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Doctrine and Covenants Lesson 37 (D&C 98-101).” The Interpreter Foundation website. August 31, 2021.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Doctrine and Covenants Lesson 38 (D&C 102-105).” The Interpreter Foundation website. September 7, 2021.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Doctrine and Covenants Lesson 39 (D&C 106-108).” The Interpreter Foundation website. September 14, 2021.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Doctrine and Covenants Lesson 4 (D&C 3–5).” The Interpreter Foundation website. January 12, 2021.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Doctrine and Covenants Lesson 40 (D&C 109-110).” The Interpreter Foundation website. September 21, 2021.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Doctrine and Covenants Lesson 41 (D&C 111-114).” The Interpreter Foundation website. September 28, 2021.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Doctrine and Covenants Lesson 42 (D&C 115-120).” The Interpreter Foundation website. October 5, 2021.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Doctrine and Covenants Lesson 43 (D&C 121-123).” The Interpreter Foundation website. October 12, 2021.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Doctrine and Covenants Lesson 44 (D&C 124).” The Interpreter Foundation website. October 19, 2021.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Doctrine and Covenants Lesson 45 (D&C 125-128).” The Interpreter Foundation website. October 26, 2021.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Doctrine and Covenants Lesson 46 (D&C 129-132).” The Interpreter Foundation website. November 2, 2021.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Doctrine and Covenants Lesson 47 (D&C 133-134).” The Interpreter Foundation website. November 9, 2021.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Doctrine and Covenants Lesson 48 (D&C 135-136).” The Interpreter Foundation website. November 16, 2021.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Doctrine and Covenants Lesson 49 (D&C 137-138).” The Interpreter Foundation website. November 23, 2021.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Doctrine and Covenants Lesson 5 (D&C 6-9).” The Interpreter Foundation website. January 19, 2021.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Doctrine and Covenants Lesson 50 (The Articles of Faith and Official Declarations 1 and 2).” The Interpreter Foundation website. November 30, 2021.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Doctrine and Covenants Lesson 51 (The Family: A Proclamation to the World).” The Interpreter Foundation website. December 7, 2021.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Doctrine and Covenants Lesson 52 (Christmas).” The Interpreter Foundation website. December 14, 2021.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Doctrine and Covenants Lesson 6 (D&C 10-11).” The Interpreter Foundation website. January 26, 2021.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Doctrine and Covenants Lesson 7 (D&C 12–13; JS—History 1:66–75).” The Interpreter Foundation website. February 2, 2021.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Doctrine and Covenants Lesson 8 (D&C 14-17).” The Interpreter Foundation website. February 9, 2021.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Doctrine and Covenants Lesson 9 (D&C 18-19).” The Interpreter Foundation website. February 16, 2021.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me New Testament Lesson 1.” The Interpreter Foundation website. December 26, 2018.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me New Testament Lesson 10 (Matt 8-9, Mark 2-5).” The Interpreter Foundation website. March 4, 2019.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me New Testament Lesson 11 (Matt 10–12, Mark 2, Luke 7, 11).” The Interpreter Foundation website. March 11, 2019.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me New Testament Lesson 12 (Matt 13, Luke 8, 13).” The Interpreter Foundation website. March 12, 2019.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me New Testament Lesson 13 (Matt 14–15, Mark 6–7, John 5–6).” The Interpreter Foundation website. March 23, 2019.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me New Testament Lesson 14 (Matt 16–17, Mark 8–9, Luke 9).” The Interpreter Foundation website. March 26, 2019.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me New Testament Lesson 15 (Easter).” The Interpreter Foundation website. April 17, 2019.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me New Testament Lesson 16 (Luke 1, Matt 18).” The Interpreter Foundation website. April 24, 2019.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me New Testament Lesson 17 (John 7-10).” The Interpreter Foundation website. April 29, 2019.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me New Testament Lesson 18 (John 11, Luke 12-17).” The Interpreter Foundation website. April 29, 2019.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me New Testament Lesson 19 (Luke 18, Mark 10, Matt 19-20).” The Interpreter Foundation website. May 4, 2019.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me New Testament Lesson 2 (Matt 1, Luke 1).” The Interpreter Foundation website. January 3, 2019.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me New Testament Lesson 20 (John 12, Luke 19-20, Mark 11, Matt 21-23).” The Interpreter Foundation website. May 24, 2019.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me New Testament Lesson 21 (JJS—Matt, Luke 21, Mark 12-13, Matt 25).” The Interpreter Foundation website. May 25, 2019.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me New Testament Lesson 22 (John 13-17).” The Interpreter Foundation website. May 31, 2019.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me New Testament Lesson 23 (John 18, Luke 22, Mark 14, Matt 26).” The Interpreter Foundation website. June 4, 2019.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me New Testament Lesson 24 (John 19, Luke 23, Mark 15, Matt 27).” The Interpreter Foundation website. June 6, 2019.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me New Testament Lesson 25 (John 20-21, Luke 24, Mark 16, Matt 28).” The Interpreter Foundation website. June 12, 2019.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me New Testament Lesson 26 (Acts 1-5).” The Interpreter Foundation website. June 20, 2019.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me New Testament Lesson 27 (Acts 6-9).” The Interpreter Foundation website. June 26, 2019.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me New Testament Lesson 28 (Acts 10-15).” The Interpreter Foundation website. July 4, 2019.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me New Testament Lesson 29 (Acts 16-21).” The Interpreter Foundation website. July 10, 2019.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me New Testament Lesson 3 (Matt 2, Luke 2).” The Interpreter Foundation website. January 3, 2019.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me New Testament Lesson 30 (Acts 22-28).” The Interpreter Foundation website. July 18, 2019.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me New Testament Lesson 31 (Romans 1-6).” The Interpreter Foundation website. July 26, 2019.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me New Testament Lesson 32 (Romans 7-16).” The Interpreter Foundation website. July 31, 2019.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me New Testament Lesson 33 (1 Corinthians 1-7).” The Interpreter Foundation website. August 7, 2019.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me New Testament Lesson 34 (1 Corinthians 8-13).” The Interpreter Foundation website. August 17, 2019.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me New Testament Lesson 35 (1 Corinthians 14-16).” The Interpreter Foundation website. August 26, 2019.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me New Testament Lesson 36 (2 Corinthians 1-7).” The Interpreter Foundation website. August 28, 2019.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me New Testament Lesson 37 (2 Corinthians 8-13).” The Interpreter Foundation website. September 6, 2019.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me New Testament Lesson 38 (Galatians).” The Interpreter Foundation website. September 11, 2019.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me New Testament Lesson 39 (Ephesians).” The Interpreter Foundation website. September 19, 2019.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me New Testament Lesson 4 (John 1).” The Interpreter Foundation website. January 9, 2019.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me New Testament Lesson 40 (Philippians & Colossians).” The Interpreter Foundation website. September 26, 2019.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me New Testament Lesson 41 (1 and 2 Thessalonians).” The Interpreter Foundation website. October 2, 2019.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me New Testament Lesson 42 (1 and 2 Timothy, Titus and Philemon).” The Interpreter Foundation website. October 11, 2019.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me New Testament Lesson 43 (Hebrews 1-6).” The Interpreter Foundation website. October 17, 2019.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me New Testament Lesson 44 (Hebrews 7-13).” The Interpreter Foundation website. October 24, 2019.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me New Testament Lesson 45 (James).” The Interpreter Foundation website. November 2, 2019.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me New Testament Lesson 46 (1 and 2 Peter).” The Interpreter Foundation website. November 5, 2019.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me New Testament Lesson 47 (1-3 John and Jude).” The Interpreter Foundation website. November 14, 2019.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me New Testament Lesson 48 (Revelation 1–11).” The Interpreter Foundation website. November 22, 2019.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me New Testament Lesson 49 (Christmas).” The Interpreter Foundation website. November 26, 2019.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me New Testament Lesson 5 (Matt 3, Mark 1, Luke 3).” The Interpreter Foundation website. January 15, 2019.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me New Testament Lesson 50 (Revelation 12-22).” The Interpreter Foundation website. December 7, 2019.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me New Testament Lesson 6 (Matt 4, Luke 4-5).” The Interpreter Foundation website. February 8, 2019.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me New Testament Lesson 7 (John 2-4).” The Interpreter Foundation website. February 8, 2019.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me New Testament Lesson 8 (Matt 5, Luke 6).” The Interpreter Foundation website. February 20, 2019.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me New Testament Lesson 9 (Matt 6-7).” The Interpreter Foundation website. February 20, 2019.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me New Testament Lesson 9B (Matt 6-7).” The Interpreter Foundation website. March 2, 2019.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Old Testament Lesson 1 (Moses 1; Abraham 3).” The Interpreter Foundation website. December 21, 2021.
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Old Testament Lesson 10 (Genesis 28–33).” The Interpreter Foundation website. February 22, 2022.
Keywords: Come Follow Me; audio; Old Testament; roundtable
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Old Testament Lesson 11 (Genesis 37–41).” The Interpreter Foundation website. March 01, 2022.
Keywords: Come Follow Me; audio; Old Testament; roundtable
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Old Testament Lesson 12 (Genesis 42–50).” The Interpreter Foundation website. March 8, 2022.
Keywords: ",Come Follow Me",, audio, Old Testament, roundtable
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Old Testament Lesson 13 (Exodus 1–6).” The Interpreter Foundation website. March 15, 2022.
Keywords: ",Come Follow Me",, audio, Old Testament, roundtable
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Old Testament Lesson 14 (Exodus 7–13).” The Interpreter Foundation website. March 22, 2022.
Keywords: ",Come Follow Me",, audio, Old Testament, roundtable
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Old Testament Lesson 15 (Exodus 14–17).” The Interpreter Foundation website. March 29, 2022.
Keywords: ",Come Follow Me",, audio, Old Testament, roundtable
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Old Testament Lesson 16 (Easter).” The Interpreter Foundation website. April 5, 2022.
Keywords: ",Come Follow Me",, audio, Old Testament, roundtable
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Old Testament Lesson 17 (Exodus 18–20).” The Interpreter Foundation website. April 12, 2022.
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Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Old Testament Lesson 18 (Exodus 24, 31–34).” The Interpreter Foundation website. April 19, 2022.
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Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Old Testament Lesson 19 (Exodus 35–40; Leviticus 1; 16; 19).” The Interpreter Foundation website. April 26, 2022.
Keywords: ",Come Follow Me",, audio, Old Testament, roundtable
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Old Testament Lesson 2 (Genesis 1-2; Moses 2-3; Abraham 4-5).” The Interpreter Foundation website. December 28, 2021.
Keywords: Come Follow Me; audio; Old Testament; roundtable
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Old Testament Lesson 20 (Numbers 11–14; 20–24).” The Interpreter Foundation website. May 3, 2022.
Keywords: ",Come Follow Me",, audio, Old Testament, roundtable
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Old Testament Lesson 21 (Deuteronomy 6–8; 15; 18; 29–30; 34).” The Interpreter Foundation website. May 10, 2022.
Keywords: ",Come Follow Me",, audio, Old Testament, roundtable
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Old Testament Lesson 22 (Joshua 1–8; 23–24).” The Interpreter Foundation website. May 17, 2022.
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Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Old Testament Lesson 23 (Judges 2–4; 6–8; 13–16).” The Interpreter Foundation website. May 24, 2022.
Keywords: ",Come Follow Me",, audio, Old Testament, roundtable
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Old Testament Lesson 24 (Ruth; 1 Samuel 1–3).” The Interpreter Foundation website. May 31, 2022.
Keywords: ",Come Follow Me",, audio, Old Testament, roundtable
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Old Testament Lesson 3 (Genesis 3-4; Moses 4-5).” The Interpreter Foundation website. January 04, 2022.
Keywords: Come Follow Me; audio; Old Testament; roundtable
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Old Testament Lesson 4 (Genesis 5; Moses 6).” The Interpreter Foundation website. January 11, 2022.
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Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Old Testament Lesson 5 (Moses 7).” The Interpreter Foundation website. January 18, 2022.
Keywords: Come Follow Me; audio; Old Testament; roundtable
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Old Testament Lesson 6 (Genesis 6-11; Moses 8).” The Interpreter Foundation website. January 25, 2022.
Keywords: Come Follow Me; audio; Old Testament; roundtable
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Old Testament Lesson 7 (Genesis 12–17; Abraham 1–2).” The Interpreter Foundation website. February 01, 2022.
Keywords: Come Follow Me; audio; Old Testament; roundtable
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Old Testament Lesson 8 (Genesis 18–23).” The Interpreter Foundation website. February 08, 2022.
Keywords: Come Follow Me; audio; Old Testament; roundtable
Interpreter Foundation. “Audio Roundtable: Come, Follow Me Old Testament Lesson 9 (Genesis 24–27).” The Interpreter Foundation website. February 15, 2022.
Keywords: Come Follow Me; audio; Old Testament; roundtable
Wright, Mark Alan. “Axes Mundi: A Comparative Analysis of Nephite and Mesoamerican Temple and Ritual Complexes.” Paper presented at the 2012 Temple on Mount Zion Conference. September 22, 2012.
Wright, Mark Alan. “Axes Mundi: Ritual Complexes in Mesoamerica and the Book of Mormon.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 12 (2014): 79-96.

Places are made sacred through manifestations of the divine or ritual activity. The occurrence of a theophany or hierophany or the performance of particular rituals can conceptually transform a place into an axis mundi, or the center of the world. A variety of such axes mundi are known from the archaeological record of Mesoamerica and the text of the Book of Mormon. I compare and contrast several distinctive types of such ritual complexes from Mesoamerica and the Book of Mormon and argue that they served functionally and ideologically similar purposes.

Wright, Mark Alan. “Axes Mundi: Ritual Complexes in Mesoamerica and the Book of Mormon.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 46 (2021): 233-248.

Abstract: An axis mundi refers to a sacred place that connects heaven and earth and is believed to be the center of the world. These places are sanctified through ritual consecration or through a divine manifestation that results in qualitatively detaching that space from the surrounding cosmos. Often expressed in architecture as a universal pillar, these axes mundi incorporate and put in communication three cosmic levels — earth, heaven, and the underworld. As Mark Alan Wright notes, Mesoamerican sacred architecture was designed according to cosmological principles and finds a modern analogy in Latter-day Saint temples. Also, among Mesoamerican civilizations and in the Book of Mormon, the temple, the axis mundi, served as a place where worshipers go to engage in sacred rituals that bridge the divide between heaven and earth and allow the worshiper entry into the divine presence.

[Editor’s Note: Part of our book chapter reprint series, this article is reprinted here as a service to the Latter-Day Saint community. Original pagination and page numbers have necessarily changed, otherwise the reprint has the same content as the original.

See Mark Alan Wright, “Axes Mundi: Ritual Complexes in Mesoamerica and the Book of Mormon,” in Temple Insights: Proceedings of the Interpreter Matthew B. Brown Memorial Conference, “The Temple on Mount Zion,” 22 September 2012, ed. William J. Hamblin and David Rolph Seely (Orem, UT: The Interpreter Foundation; Salt Lake City: Eborn Books, 2014), 187–202. Further information at https://interpreterfoundation.org/books/temple-insights/.].

B

Carmack, Stanford A. “Bad Grammar in the Book of Mormon Found in Early English Bibles.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 36 (2020): 1-28.

Abstract: This study describes ten types of grammatical usage found in early modern Bibles with correlates in the original text of the Book of Mormon. In some cases Joseph Smith’s own language could have produced the matching grammar, but in other cases his own linguistic preferences were unlikely to have produced the patterns or usage found in the original text. Comparative linguistic research indicates that this grammatical correspondence shouldn’t be a surprise, since plenty of Book of Mormon syntax matches structures and patterns found in Early Modern English.

Swift, Hales. “Baptism as the Establishment of a Covenant Community (Mosiah 18).” The Interpreter Foundation website. May 5, 2020.
Swift, Hales. “Baptism Understood in Light of the Tree of Life Vision (2 Nephi 31).” The Interpreter Foundation website. March 17, 2020.
Barney, Kevin L. “Baptized for the Dead.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 39 (2020): 103-150.

Abstract: This thorough treatment of the mention of baptism for the dead in 1 Corinthians 15:29 gives a meticulous analysis of Paul’s Greek argument, and lays out the dozens (or perhaps hundreds) of theories that have been put forth with respect to its interpretation. Barney concludes that “the most natural reading” and the “majority contemporary scholarly reading” is that of “vicarious baptism.” Therefore, “the Prophet Joseph Smith’s reading of the passage to refer to such a practice was indeed correct.”

[Editor’s Note: Part of our book chapter reprint series, this article is reprinted here as a service to the LDS community. Original pagination and page numbers have necessarily changed, otherwise the reprint has the same content as the original.See Kevin L. Barney, “Baptized for the Dead,” in “To Seek the Law of the Lord”: Essays in Honor of John W. Welch, ed. Paul Y. Hoskisson and Daniel C. Peterson (Orem, UT: The Interpreter Foundation, 2017), 9–58. Further information at https://interpreterfoundation.org/books/to-seek-the-law-of-the-lord-essays-in-honor-of-john-w-welch-2/.]

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Wells, Anita. “Bare Record: The Nephite Archivist, The Record of Records, and the Book of Mormon Provenance.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 24 (2017): 99-122.

Abstract: This paper looks at the Book of Mormon through the lens of library science and the concept of archival provenance. The Nephites cared deeply about their records, and Mormon documented a thorough chain of custody for the plates he edited. However, ideas of archival science and provenance are recent developments in the western world, unknown to biblical authors or to anyone at Joseph Smith’s time. Understanding this aspect of Mormon’s authorship and Joseph Smith’s translation provides additional evidence to the historical validity of the Book of Mormon.

Carmack, Stanford A. “Barlow on Book of Mormon Language: An Examination of Some Strained Grammar.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 27 (2017): 185-196.

Abstract: Comments made by Philip Barlow on Book of Mormon language for an Oxford-published book are examined. Inaccuracies are pointed out, and some examples are given that show matching with 1611 King James usage as well as with other earlier usage. One important conclusion that can be drawn from this study is that those who wish to critique the English language of the Book of Mormon need to take the subject more seriously and approach it with genuine scholarship, instead of repeating earlier errors. This has a direct bearing on forming accurate views of Joseph Smith and Book of Mormon translation.

There are some errors which is easilier persuaded unto than to some truths.

Henry, Earl of Monmouth (translator)

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Thompson, John S. “Barren Women, the Christmas Story, and the Promise of Seed in Both Time and Eternity.” The Interpreter Foundation website. December 2, 2020.
Densley, Steven T., Jr., and Geret Giles. “Barriers to Belief: Mental Distress and Disaffection from the Church.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 31 (2019): 71-94.

Abstract: People leave the Church for a variety of reasons. Of all the reasons why people leave, one that has attracted little or no attention is the influence of mental distress. People who experience anxiety or depression see things differently than those who do not. Recognizing that people with mental distress have a different experience with church than others may help us to make adjustments that can prevent some amount of disaffection from the Church. This article takes a first step in identifying ways that mental distress can affect church activity and in presenting some of the things that individuals, friends, family members and Church leaders can do to help make being a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints a little easier for those who experience mental distress.

[Editor’s Note: This paper was presented at the 2018 FairMormon Conference in Provo, Utah, August 2, 2018.

To prepare it for publication, it has been source checked and copy edited; otherwise it appears here as first presented.].

Interpreter Foundation. “Bart J. Kowallis on ‘From All Eternity to All Eternity: Deep Time and the Gospel’” The Interpreter Foundation website. November 24, 2014.
Schaalje, G. Bruce. “A Bayesian Cease-Fire in the Late War on the Book of Mormon.” The Interpreter Foundation website. November 6, 2013.
Halverson, Taylor. “‘Be Not Deceived, but Continue in Steadfastness’ Doctrine & Covenants 26; 28; 43:1-7; 50; 52:14-19.” The Interpreter Foundation website. August 29, 2013.
Halverson, Taylor. “‘Be Strong and of a Good Courage.’ Joshua 1-6; 23-24.” The Interpreter Foundation website. April 23, 2014.
Halverson, Taylor. “Be Ye Therefore Loyal, Even as Your Father Which is in Heaven is Loyal.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 48 (2021): 1-10.

Abstract: The scriptures are saturated with covenantal words and terms. Any serious or close reading of the scriptures that misses or ignores the covenantal words, phrases, and literary structure of scripture runs the risk of missing the full purpose of why God preserved the scriptures for us. This is especially true for the Old Testament and the Book of Mormon, which emerged out of an Old Testament cultural context. Research during the past century on ancient Near Eastern covenants has brought clarity to the covenantal meaning and context of a variety of words and literary structures in the Old Testament and the Book of Mormon. This article builds on that revealing research to show that the English word “perfect” in a covenantal context in scripture can also be represented with the covenantal synonyms of “loyal, loyalty, faithful, and trustworthy.” God has revealed and preserved the scriptures as records of these covenants and of the consequences of covenantal loyalty or disloyalty. The Lord’s injunction to “be ye therefore perfect” (Matthew 5:48) is beautifully magnified when we realize that we are not simply asked to be without sin, but, rather, to “be ye therefore covenantally loyal” even as God has been eternally and covenantally loyal to us.


Davis, Ryan W. “Bearing Testimony in Hebrew.” Paper presented at the 2018 Temple on Mount Zion Conference. November 10, 2018.
Bradshaw, Jeffrey M. “Beauty and Truth in Moses 1.” Paper presented at the 2018 Temple on Mount Zion Conference. November 10, 2018.
LDS Perspectives. “Beauty for Ashes - Scott Livingston.” The Interpreter Foundation website. March 28, 2018.
Gardner, Brant A. “Beauty Way More Than Skin Deep.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 20 (2016): 345-347.

Review of Royal Skousen, Robin Scott Jensen, eds., The Joseph Smith Papers: Revelations and Translations Volume 3, Part 1: Printer’s Manuscript of the Book of Mormon 1 Nephi–Alma 35 (Salt Lake City: The Church Historian’s Press, 2015). pp 575. $89.99.

Abstract: All of the volumes in the Joseph Smith Papers series are beautifully presented, with important photographic and excellent typographic versions of the texts. This volume continues by providing this treatment for the Printer’s Manuscript of the Book of Mormon.

Interpreter Foundation. “‘Because of Him’: The Church’s Easter Initiative, Website and Video.” The Interpreter Foundation website. April 13, 2014.
LDS Perspectives. “Becoming Like God–Gospel Topics Essay, with Terryl Givens.” The Interpreter Foundation website. November 8, 2017.
Bowen, Matthew L. “Becoming Men and Women of Understanding: Wordplay on Benjamin — An Addendum.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 36 (2020): 239-280.

Abstract: Royal and divine sonship/daughterhood (bānîm = “children”/“sons,” bānôt = “daughters”) is a prevalent theme throughout the Book of Mosiah. “Understanding” (Hebrew noun, bînâ or tĕbûnâ; verb, bîn) is also a key theme in that book. The initial juxtaposition of “sons” and “understanding” with the name “Benjamin” (binyāmîn, “son of the right hand”) in Mosiah 1:2–7 suggests the narrator’s association of the underlying terms with the name Benjamin likely on the basis of homophony. King Benjamin repeatedly invokes “understand” in his speech (forms of “understand” were derived from the root *byn in Hebrew; Mosiah 2:9, 40; 4:4; cf. 3:15) — a speech that culminates in a rhetorical wordplay on his own name in terms of “sons”/“children,” “daughters,” and “right hand” (Mosiah 5:7, 9). “Understand,” moreover, recurs as a paronomasia on the name Benjamin at key points later in the Book of Mosiah (Mosiah 8:3, 20; 26:1–3), which bring together the themes of sonship and/or “understanding” (or lack of thereof) with King Benjamin’s name. Later statements in the Book of Mosiah about “becoming” the “children of God” or “becoming his sons and daughters” (Mosiah 18:22; 27:25) through divine rebirth allude to King Benjamin’s sermon and the wordplay on “Benjamin” there. Taken as a literary whole, the book of Mosiah constitutes a treatise on “becoming” — i.e., divine transformation through Christ’s atonement (cf. Mosiah 3:18–19). Mormon’s statement in Alma 17:2 about the sons of Mosiah having become “men of a sound understanding” thus serves as a fitting epilogue to a narrative arc begun as early as Mosiah 1:2.

Halverson, Taylor. “‘Being Good Citizens’ D&C 58:21-22, 26-28; D&C 98:4-10; 134; Articles of Faith 1:12.” The Interpreter Foundation website. October 13, 2013.
Boyce, Duane. “‘Beloved by All the People’: A Fresh Look at Captain Moroni.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 45 (2021): 181-204.

Abstract: In his well-known volume about the Book of Mormon, Grant Hardy focuses primarily on the book’s main narrators. However, he also makes a number of observations about other figures in the book that are of particular interest, including some about Captain Moroni. In addition to those I address elsewhere, these observations range from the assertion that Captain Moroni slaughtered his political opponents in one instance, to his claim that Moroni is not depicted as “particularly religious,” to his claim that Moroni had a “quick temper.” The question is: Are such observations supported in the text? Carefully examining this question both shows the answer to be “no” and allows a deeper look into Captain Moroni.

Halverson, Taylor. “‘Besides Me There is No Saviour.’ Isaiah 40-49.” The Interpreter Foundation website. September 14, 2014.
Peterson, Daniel C. “Better Kingdom-Building through Triage.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 46 (2021): vii-xiv.

Abstract: We are called to take the Gospel to the entire world, but our numbers are few and our time and resources are limited. This is where cold calculation can help. A field-surgical technique pioneered during the Napoleonic Wars of the early nineteenth century and refined in the butchery of World War I a century later offers a useful model for making our missionary efforts more efficient and more effective.

Halverson, Taylor. “Between the Testaments: An Invitation to Explore the Intertestamental Time Period.” The Interpreter Foundation website. July 3, 2013.
Hancock, Ralph C. “Beyond Agency as Idolatry.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 21 (2016): 147-153.

Review of Adam S. Miller, Future Mormon: Essays in Mormon Theology (Salt Lake City: Greg Kofford Books, 2016).

Lindsay, Jeff. “Beyond Calculation: A Review of Robert J. Sawyer’s Calculating God.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 49 (2021): 259-268.

Review of Robert J. Sawyer, Calculating God (New York: Tom Doherty Associates, 2000). 336 pp. $23.99 (paperback).

Abstract: In an entertaining and provocative science fiction novel, Calculating God, Robert J. Sawyer presents us with a likable alien scientist visiting earth to obtain more data about God’s ongoing work of creation. The alien is astounded that a human scientist does not believe in God despite the obvious evidence. Sawyer’s work introduces a variety of reasonable scientific arguments for the existence of God in a series of cleverly conceived dialogs and uses dramatic events to develop some perspectives on God. Sawyer’s purpose is not to evangelize, and the troubling concept of an utterly impersonal God who emerges in Sawyer’s interplay between multiple worlds is quite alien to Christianity and especially to the revelations from Joseph Smith, which offer a much more hopeful perspective. Calculating God is a delightful read that raises some questions that need to be discussed more often, but to obtain meaningful answers, a different calculus is needed.

Shannon, Avram R. “The Bible Before and After: Interpretation and Translation in Antiquity and the Book of Moses.” Presented at the conference entitled “Tracing Ancient Threads of the Book of Moses” (April 23-24, 2021), Provo, UT: Brigham Young University 2021.
Shannon, Avram R. “The Bible Before and After: Interpretation and Translation in Antiquity and the Book of Moses.” In Tracing Ancient Threads in the Book of Moses: Inspired Origins, Temple Contexts, and Literary Qualities, Volume 1. Edited by Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, David R. Seely, John W. Welch and Scott Gordon, 257–92. Orem, UT; Springville, UT; Redding, CA; Tooele, UT: The Interpreter Foundation, Book of Mormon Central, FAIR, and Eborn Books, 2021.
Tvedtnes, John A. “Biblical and Non-Biblical Quotes in the Sermons and Epistles of Paul.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 3 (2013): 7-61.

Abstract: In 2010, BYU’s Neal A. Maxwell Institute published an article in which I demonstrated that the charge of plagiarism, frequently leveled against Joseph Smith by critics, is untrue. ((John A. Tvedtnes, “Was Joseph Smith Guilty of Plagiarism?” FARMS Review 22/1 (2010): 261–75.)) I noted, among other things, that the authors of books of the Bible sometimes quoted their predecessors. One of those authors was the apostle Paul, who drew upon a wide range of earlier texts in his epistles. This article discusses and demonstrates his sources.

Hamblin, William J. “The biblical definition of Christian.” The Interpreter Foundation website. August 30, 2012.
Foster, Craig L., and Brian C. Hales. “Big Trouble in River City: American Crucifixion and the Defaming of Joseph Smith.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 11 (2014): 177-207.

Review of Alex Beam. American Crucifixion: The Murder of Joseph Smith and the Fate of the Mormon Church. PublicAffairs, 2014. 352 pp.

Abstract: On April 22, 2014, PublicAffairs, an imprint of a national publisher Persues Books Group, released American Crucifixion: The Murder of Joseph Smith and the Fate of the Mormon Church, authored by Alex Beam. Beam, who openly declared he entered the project without personal biases against Joseph Smith or the Latter-day Saints, spent a couple of years researching his work, which he declares to be “popular non-fiction” and therefore historically accurate. This article challenges both of these assertions, showing that Beam was highly prejudiced against the Church prior to investigating and writing about events leading up to the martyrdom. In addition, Beam’s lack of training as an historian is clearly manifested in gross lapses in methodology, documentation, and synthesis of his interpretation. Several key sections of his book are so poorly constructed from an evidentiary standpoint that the book cannot be considered useful except, perhaps, as well-composed historical fiction.

Interpreter Foundation. “Bios.” 2016 Second Interpreter Science & Mormonism Symposium: Body, Brain, Mind, and Spirit. The Interpreter Foundation website. March 12, 2016.
Interpreter Foundation. “Bios & Abstracts.” The Interpreter Foundation website. 2013.
Halverson, Taylor. “‘Birthright Blessings; Marriage in the Covenant’ Genesis 24-29.” The Interpreter Foundation website. July 24, 2013.
Interpreter Foundation. “Black & White Edition of Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship, Volume 37.” The Interpreter Foundation website. August 27, 2020.
Interpreter Foundation. “BoM Gospel Doctrine Resource Index.” The Interpreter Foundation website.
Interpreter Foundation. “Book Forthcoming: Science & Mormonism Symposium.” The Interpreter Foundation website. January 10, 2014.
Bradshaw, Jeffrey M. “‘The Book Nobody Wants’: Hugh Nibley and the Book of Mormon.” In Hugh Nibley Observed Introductory Blog Series, by Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, Interpreter Foundation, Book of Mormon Central, FAIR. 8 April 2021.

This is the second of eight weekly blog posts published in honor of the life and work of Hugh Nibley.

Hugh Nibley ironically called the Book of Mormon “the Book Nobody Wants,” since many people act like it’s being forced on them. This article attempts to answer the question, “What did Nibley mean by the Book Nobody Wants?”

Smoot, Stephen O. “Book Notice: Becoming the Beloved Disciple.” The Interpreter Foundation website. December 15, 2018.
Lindsay, Jeff. “Book of Abraham Polemics: Dan Vogel’s Broad Critique of the Defense of the Book of Abraham.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 47 (2021): 107-150.

Review of Dan Vogel, Book of Abraham Apologetics: A Review and Critique (Salt Lake City: Signature Books, 2021). 250 pp. $18.95 (softback).

Abstract: Dan Vogel’s latest book claims to offer clear-cut evidence showing what, when, and how Joseph Smith fraudulently translated the Book of Abraham. While he claims to use an objective approach, he instead weaves a polemical agenda that ignores some of the most important scholarship in favor of the Book of Abraham. He ignores crucial evidence and relies on assumptions and hypotheses as if they were established facts. The arguments of apologists, which he claims to be reviewing and critiquing, are often overlooked or, when treated, attacked without letting readers know the substance of the apologetic argument. He neglects key arguments, and important documents that don’t fit his theory. The work is a valuable tool to explore Book of Abraham polemics, but it is not even-handed scholarship by any means. Vogel’s latest contribution does not overturn the evidence against his paradigm nor overthrow the growing body of insights into the antiquity of the Book of Abraham.


LDS Perspectives. “The Book of Abraham with Robin Scott Jensen.” The Interpreter Foundation website. November 7, 2018.
Interpreter Foundation. “Book of Mormon Archaeological Forum Conference Coming Soon!” The Interpreter Foundation website. October 2, 2013.
Mitton, George L. “The Book of Mormon as a Resurrected Book and a Type of Christ.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 42 (2021): 371-396.

Abstract: This essay emphasizes the remarkable participation of the Book of Mormon in the gospel symbolism of death and resurrection. It explains how the Book of Mormon itself may be seen as a resurrected book, witnessing Christ’s resurrection in a remarkable way.

[Editor’s Note: Part of our book chapter reprint series, this article is reprinted here as a service to the LDS community. Original pagination and page numbers have necessarily changed, otherwise the reprint has the same content as the original.See George L. Mitton, “The Book of Mormon as a Resurrected Book and a Type of Christ,” in Remembrance and Return: Essays in Honor of Louis C. Midgley, ed. Ted Vaggalis and Daniel C. Peterson (Orem, UT: The Interpreter Foundation; Salt Lake City: Eborn Books, 2021), 121–46. Further information about the book and how to order it at: https://interpreterfoundation.org/books/remembrance-and-return/.].

Rappleye, Neal, and Stephen O. Smoot. “Book of Mormon Minimalists and the NHM Inscriptions: A Response to Dan Vogel.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 8 (2014): 157-185.

Abstract: Biblical “minimalists” have sought to undermine or de-emphasize the significance of the Tel Dan inscription attesting to the existence of the “house of David.” Similarly, those who might be called Book of Mormon “minimalists” such as Dan Vogel have marshaled evidence to try to make the nhm inscriptions from south Arabia, corresponding to the Book of Mormon Nahom, seem as irrelevant as possible. We show why the nhm inscriptions still stand as impressive evidence for the historicity of the Book of Mormon.

Interpreter Foundation. “Book of Mormon Onomasticon.” The Interpreter Foundation website. June 29, 2013.
Interpreter Foundation. “Book of Mormon Theology in Its Secular Context.” The Interpreter Foundation website. January 5, 2014.
Lindsay, Jeff. “The Book of Mormon Versus the Consensus of Scholars: Surprises from the Disputed Longer Ending of Mark, Part 1.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 25 (2017): 283-321.

Abstract: Following the account of the ministry of Christ among the Nephites as recorded in the Book of Mormon, Christ gave a charge to His New World disciples (Mormon 9:22–25). These words are very similar to the commission of Christ to His apostles at the end of the Gospel of Mark (Mark 16:9–20). According to the consensus of modern Bible scholars, Christ did not speak those words; they are a later addition. If so, this is a problem for the Book of Mormon. Fortunately, recent modern scholarship offers compelling reasons for overturning the old consensus against the longer ending of Mark. Some of the factors from modern scholarship that indirectly help overcome a potentially serious objection to and apparent weakness in the Book of Mormon also help us better appreciate its strength as we explore unifying themes derived from an ancient Jewish perspective. In this Part 1 of a two-part series, we look at the evidence for the unity of Mark and the plausibility of Mormon 9:22–25. In Part 2 we examine further Book of Mormon implications from the thematic evidence for the unity of Mark.

Lindsay, Jeff. “The Book of Mormon Versus the Consensus of Scholars: Surprises from the Disputed Longer Ending of Mark, Part 2.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 25 (2017): 323-365.

Abstract: Following the account of the ministry of Christ among the Nephites as recorded in the Book of Mormon, Christ gave a charge to His New World disciples (Mormon 9:22–25). These words are nearly like the commission of Christ to His apostles at the end of the Gospel of Mark (Mark 16:9–20). According to the general consensus of modern Bible scholars, Christ did not speak those words; they are a later addition. If so, this is a problem for the Book of Mormon. Fortunately, recent modern scholarship offers compelling reasons for overturning the old consensus against the longer ending of Mark. Some of the factors from modern scholarship that indirectly help overcome a potentially serious objection to and apparent weakness in the Book of Mormon also help us better appreciate its strength as we explore unifying themes derived from an ancient Jewish perspective. Part 1 of this two-part series looked at the evidence for the unity of Mark and the plausibility of Mormon 9:22–25. In Part 2, we examine further Book of Mormon implications from the thematic evidence for the unity of Mark.

Peterson, Daniel C. “The Book of Mormon Witnesses and Their Challenge to Secularism.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 27 (2017): vii-xxviii.

There has been much comment recently on the growth in numbers of the religious “nones.” Not all of them are actually non-theists, but secularism or naturalism is undoubtedly on the rise — and Latter-day Saints have not escaped damage from the trend. Several recent books and articles have sought to help their readers live with doubt, cope with uncertainty, or find value or joy in the Mormon community even when some, most, or perhaps even all of its founding narrative has come to seem untenable. I believe, however, that naturalism should be directly challenged and that the Book of Mormon is among our best tools for doing so. And the Witnesses to the Book of Mormon are, in turn, some of our best evidences for its truth — and the only “secular” evidence that the Lord himself has provided.

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Heimerdinger, Chris. “The Book of Mormon: A Brilliant Mess.” The Interpreter Foundation website. April 12, 2014.
Interpreter Foundation. “The Book of Mormon: The Earliest Text is now available in e-book format.” The Interpreter Foundation website. July 23, 2013.
Carmack, Stanford A. “The Book of Mormon’s Complex Finite Cause Syntax.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 49 (2021): 113-136.

Abstract: This paper describes and compares the Book of Mormon’s 12 instances of complex finite cause syntax, the structure exemplified by the language of Ether 9:33: “the Lord did cause the serpents that they should pursue them no more.” This is not King James language or currently known to be pseudo-archaic language (language used by modern authors seeking to imitate biblical or related archaic language), but it does occur in earlier English, almost entirely before the year 1700. In the Book of Mormon, the syntax is always expressed with the modal auxiliary verbs should and shall. Twenty-five original examples of this specific usage have been identified so far outside of the Book of Mormon (not counting two cases of creative biblical editing — see the appendix). The text’s larger pattern of clausal verb complementation after the verb cause, 58 percent finite in 236 instances, is utterly different from what we encounter in the King James Bible and pseudo-archaic texts, which are 99 to 100 percent infinitival in their clausal complementation. The totality of the evidence indicates that Joseph Smith would not have produced this causative syntax of the Book of Mormon in a pseudo-archaic effort. Therefore, this dataset provides additional strong evidence for a revealed-words view of the 1829 dictation.

Givens, Terryl L. “The Book of Moses as a Pre–Augustinian Text: A New Look at the Pelagian Crisis.” In Tracing Ancient Threads in the Book of Moses: Inspired Origins, Temple Contexts, and Literary Qualities, Volume 1. Edited by Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, David R. Seely, John W. Welch and Scott Gordon, 293–314. Orem, UT; Springville, UT; Redding, CA; Tooele, UT: The Interpreter Foundation, Book of Mormon Central, FAIR, and Eborn Books, 2021.
Bradshaw, Jeffrey M. “The Book of Moses as a Temple Text.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 49 (2021): 63-112.

Abstract: In this fascinating article, Jeff Bradshaw details how the Book of Moses might be understood as a temple text, including elements of temple architecture, furnishings, and ritual in the story of the Creation and the Fall. Bradshaw shows how the second half of the Book of Moses follows a general pattern of a specific sequence of covenants that will resonate with members of the Church who have received the temple endowment. The story of Enoch and his people provides a vivid demonstration of the final steps on the path that leads back to God and exaltation.

Bradshaw, Jeffrey M. “The Book of Moses as a Temple Text.” In Tracing Ancient Threads in the Book of Moses: Inspired Origins, Temple Contexts, and Literary Qualities, Volume 1. Edited by Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, David R. Seely, John W. Welch and Scott Gordon, 421–68. Orem, UT; Springville, UT; Redding, CA; Tooele, UT: The Interpreter Foundation, Book of Mormon Central, FAIR, and Eborn Books, 2021.
Carmack, Stanford A. “Book of Moses English: A Comparison of Grammatical Usage Found in Old Testament Revision 1.” Presented at the conference entitled “Tracing Ancient Threads of the Book of Moses” (April 23-24, 2021), Provo, UT: Brigham Young University 2021.
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #1: Enoch’s Prophetic Commission (Moses 6:26–36) — Introduction.” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. May 02, 2020.
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #2: Enoch’s Prophetic Commission — The Opening of Enoch’s Mouth and Eyes (Moses 6:31–32, 35).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. May 09, 2020.
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #3: Enoch’s Prophetic Commission — Enoch As a Lad (Moses 6:31).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. May 16, 2020.
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #4: Enoch’s Prophetic Commission — Enoch’s Power Over the Elements and His Divine Protection (Moses 6:32, 34).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. May 23, 2020.
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #5: Enoch’s Preaching Mission — Were Ancient Enoch Manuscripts the Inspiration for Moses 6–7? (Moses 6–7).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. May 30, 2020.
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #6: Enoch’s Preaching Mission — Enoch and the Other ‘Wild Man’ (Moses 6:38).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. June 06, 2020.
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #7: Enoch’s Preaching Mission — Could Joseph Smith Have Borrowed ‘Mahijah/Mahujah’ from the Book of Giants? (Moses 6:40).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. June 13, 2020.
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #8: Enoch’s Preaching Mission — Mahijah and Mahaway Interrogate Enoch (Moses 6:40).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. June 20, 2020.
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #9: Enoch’s Preaching Mission — Secret Works, Oaths, and Murders (Moses 6:15).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. June 27, 2020.
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #10: Enoch’s Preaching Mission — Enoch Reads from a Book of Remembrance (Moses 6:46–47).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. July 04, 2020.
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #11: Enoch’s Preaching Mission — Enoch’s Call Raises the Possibility of Repentance (Moses 6:47, 50–68).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. July 11, 2020.
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #12: Enoch’s Preaching Mission — The Defeat of the Gibborim and the Roar of the Wild Beasts (Moses 7:13).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. July 18, 2020.
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #13: Enoch’s Preaching Mission — Imprisonment of the Gibborim (Moses 7:38).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. July 25, 2020.
Book of Mormon Central, Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, and Matthew L. Bowen. “Essay #14: The Teachings of Enoch — Enoch as a Teacher (Moses 6:51–68).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. August 01, 2020.
Book of Mormon Central, Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, and Matthew L. Bowen. “Essay #15: The Teachings of Enoch — ‘The Son of Man, Even Jesus Christ, a Righteous Judge’ (Moses 6:57).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. August 08, 2020.
Book of Mormon Central, Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, and Matthew L. Bowen. “Essay #16: The Teachings of Enoch — ‘By Water, and Blood, and the Spirit’ (Moses 6:58–60).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. August 15, 2020.
Book of Mormon Central, Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, and Matthew L. Bowen. “Essay #17: The Teachings of Enoch — ‘By the Water Ye Keep the Commandment’ (Moses 6:60, 64).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. August 22, 2020.
Book of Mormon Central, Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, and Matthew L. Bowen. “Essay #18: The Teachings of Enoch — ‘Out of the Waters of Judah’ (1 Nephi 20:1; JST Genesis 17:3–7).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. August 29, 2020.
Book of Mormon Central, Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, and Matthew L. Bowen. “Essay #19: The Teachings of Enoch — ‘By the Spirit Ye Are Justified’ (Moses 6:60, 63, 65–66).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. September 05, 2020.
Book of Mormon Central, Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, and Matthew L. Bowen. “Essay #20: The Teachings of Enoch — ‘By the Blood Ye Are Sanctified’ (Moses 6:60).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. September 12, 2020.
Book of Mormon Central, Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, and Matthew L. Bowen. “Essay #21: The Teachings of Enoch — ‘Thus May All Become My Sons’ (Moses 6:59, 66–68).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. September 19, 2020.
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #22: Enoch the Prophet and Seer — Enoch’s Transfiguration (Moses 7:1–3).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. September 26, 2020.
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #23: Enoch the Prophet and Seer — Enoch’s Prophecy of the Tribes (Moses 7:5–11, 22).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. October 03, 2020.
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #24: Enoch, the Prophet and Seer: The End of the Wicked and the Beginnings of Zion (Moses 7:12–18).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. October 10, 2020.
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #25: Enoch’s Grand Vision: A Chorus of Weeping (Moses 7:18–49).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. October 17, 2020.
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #26: Enoch’s Grand Vision: The Complaining Voice of the Earth (Moses 7:48–49, 54, 61, 64).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. October 24, 2020.
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #27: Enoch’s Grand Vision: The Weeping Voice of the Heavens (Moses 7:28–29, 40, 42–43).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. October 31, 2020.
Book of Mormon Central, Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, Jacob A. Rennaker, and David J. Larsen. “Essay #28: Enoch’s Grand Vision: The Weeping of Enoch (Moses 7:28–43).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. November 07, 2020.
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #29: Enoch’s Grand Vision: The Earth Shall Rest (Moses 7:60–69).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. November 14, 2020.
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #30: Enoch’s Grand Vision: God Receives Zion unto Himself (Moses 7:18–19, 68–69).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. November 21, 2020.
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #31: Moses 1 in Its Ancient Context: Heavenly Ascent and Ritual Ascent (Moses 1).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. November 28, 2020.
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #32: Moses 1 in Its Ancient Context: The Two-Part Pattern of Heavenly and Ritual Ascent (Moses 1).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. December 05, 2020.
Book of Mormon Central, Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, David J. Larsen, and Stephen T. Whitlock. “Essay #33: Moses 1 in Its Ancient Context: Moses 1 as a ‘Missing’ Prologue to Genesis (Moses 1).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. December 12, 2020.
Book of Mormon Central, Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, David J. Larsen, and Stephen T. Whitlock. “Essay #34: Moses 1 in Its Ancient Context: Moses in the Spirit World (Moses 1:1–8).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. December 19, 2020.
Book of Mormon Central, Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, David J. Larsen, and Stephen T. Whitlock. “Essay #35: Moses 1 in Its Ancient Context: Moses Falls to the Earth (Moses 1:9-11).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. December 26, 2020.
Book of Mormon Central, Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, David J. Larsen, and Stephen T. Whitlock. “Essay #36: Moses 1 in Its Ancient Context: Moses Defeats Satan (Moses 1:12–23).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. January 02, 2021.
Book of Mormon Central, Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, David J. Larsen, and Stephen T. Whitlock. “Essay #37: Moses 1 in Its Ancient Context: Moses Ascends to Heaven (Moses 1:24).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. January 09, 2021.
Book of Mormon Central, Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, David J. Larsen, and Stephen T. Whitlock. “Essay #38: Moses 1 in Its Ancient Context: Moses Passes Through the Heavenly Veil (Moses 1:25–27).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. January 16, 2021.
Book of Mormon Central, Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, Matthew L. Bowen, David J. Larsen, and Stephen T. Whitlock. “Essay #39: Moses 1 in Its Ancient Context: The Names of Moses as ‘Keywords’ (Moses 1:25).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. January 23, 2021.
Book of Mormon Central, Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, Matthew L. Bowen, David J. Larsen, and Stephen T. Whitlock. “Essay #40: Moses 1 in Its Ancient Context: Moses’ Vision at the Veil (Moses 1:27–30).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. January 30, 2021.
Book of Mormon Central, Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, Matthew L. Bowen, David J. Larsen, and Stephen T. Whitlock. “Essay #41: Moses 1 in Its Ancient Context: Moses in the Presence of God (Moses 1:31, chapters 2-4).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. February 06, 2021.
Book of Mormon Central, Matthew L. Bowen, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #42: Moses 1 in Its Ancient Context: ‘The Words of God’ (Moses 1:1–7, 35, 40–42).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. February 13, 2021.
Book of Mormon Central, Matthew L. Bowen, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #43: Moses 1: A Literary Masterpiece. Many-Great Waters and Moses’ Mission to Baptize (Moses 1:25-26).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. February 20, 2021.
Book of Mormon Central, and Mark J. Johnson. “Essay #44: Moses 1: A Literary Masterpiece. Hebrew Literary Features of Moses 1 (Moses 1).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. February 27, 2021.
Book of Mormon Central, and Mark J. Johnson. “Essay #45: Moses 1: A Literary Masterpiece. Chiasmus in Moses 1 (Moses 1).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. March 06, 2021.
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #46: Moses Witnesses the Creation (Moses 2): The Days of Creation and Temple Architecture (Moses 2:1-27).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. March 13, 2021.
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #47: Moses Witnesses the Creation (Moses 2): The Creation of Light and the Heavenly Host (Moses 2:3-5).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. March 20, 2021.
Book of Mormon Central, Matthew L. Bowen, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #48: Moses Witnesses the Creation (Moses 2): ‘This I Did By the Word of My Power’ (Moses 2:5).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. March 28, 2021.
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #49: Let Us Make Man in Our Image, After Our Likeness (Moses 2:26).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. April 03, 2021.
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #50: Moses Witnesses the Creation (Moses 2): ‘Male and Female Created I Them’ (Moses 2:27).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. April 10, 2021.
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #51: Moses Witnesses the Creation (Moses 2): Science and the Creation of Man (Moses 2:26–27).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. April 17, 2021.
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #52: Moses Sees the Garden of Eden (Moses 3): The Seventh Day (Moses 3:1–3).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. April 24, 2021.
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #53: Moses Sees the Garden of Eden (Moses 3): Is the transition between Moses 2 and 3 a clumsy stitch or a skillful shift? (Moses 3:4–5).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. May 01, 2021.
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #54: Moses Sees the Garden of Eden (Moses 3): Spiritual Creation (Moses 3:5–7).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. May 08, 2021.
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #55: Moses Sees the Garden of Eden (Moses 3): The Garden of Eden as a Model for the Temple in Israel and Old Babylon (Moses 3:8–15).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. May 15, 2021.
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #56: Moses Sees the Garden of Eden (Moses 3): The Naming of Animals, Angels, Adam, and Eve (Moses 3:8–15).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. May 22, 2021.
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #57: Moses Sees the Garden of Eden (Moses 3): God Instructs Adam and Eve (Moses 3:15–17).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. May 29, 2021.
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #58: Moses Sees the Garden of Eden (Moses 3): The Symbolism of the Tree of Knowledge and the Tree of Life (Moses 3:9).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. June 05, 2021.
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #59: Moses Witnesses the Fall (Moses 4): Satan’s Original Glory and the Symbols of Kingship (Moses 4:1–4).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. June 12, 2021.
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #60: Moses Witnesses the Fall (Moses 4): The Willing and Unwilling Sons in the Council in Heaven (Moses 4:1-4).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. June 19, 2021.
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #61: Moses Witnesses the Fall (Moses 4): The Tree in the Sacred Center of the Garden of Eden (Moses 3:9).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. June 26, 2021.
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #62: Moses Witnesses the Fall (Moses 4): What Was the Nature of Satan’s Premortal Proposal? (Moses 4:1–4).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. July 03, 2021.
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #63: Moses Witnesses the Fall (Moses 4): The False and the True ‘Keeper of the Gate’ (Moses 4:5–12).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. July 10, 2021.
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #64: Moses Witnesses the Fall (Moses 4): The False Apron and the Tree of Death and Rebirth (Moses 4:13).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. July 17, 2021.
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #65: Moses Witnesses the Fall (Moses 4): A Curse for the Serpent (Moses 4:14–21).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. July 24, 2021.
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #66: Moses Witnesses the Fall (Moses 4): The Challenges and Blessings of Celestial Marriage (Moses 4:22–26).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. July 31, 2021.
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #67: Moses Witnesses the Fall (Moses 4): Was Eve Beguiled? (Moses 4:5–12).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. August 07, 2021.
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #68: Moses Witnesses the Fall (Moses 4): The Nakedness and Clothing of Adam and Eve (Moses 3:25, 4:13–17, 27).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. August 14, 2021.
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #69: Moses Witnesses the Fall (Moses 4): ‘Stand Ye in Holy Places, and Be Not Moved’ (Moses 4:29–31).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. August 21, 2021.
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #70: Moses Witnesses the Fall (Moses 4): The ‘Temple Work’ of Adam and Eve (Moses 4:23–25, 31).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. August 28, 2021.
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #71: The Two Ways (Moses 5): The Prayer of Adam and Eve (Moses 5:4).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. September 04, 2021.
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #72: The Two Ways (Moses 5): Adam, Eve, and the New and Everlasting Covenant (Moses 5:4–6).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. September 11, 2021.
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #73: The Two Ways (Moses 5): The Five Celestial Laws (Moses, chapters 5–8).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. September 18, 2021.
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #74: The Family of Adam and Eve (Moses 6:1–12).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. September 25, 2021.
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #75: Noah (Moses 8): The Sons of God and the Sons of Men (Moses 8:1-21).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. October 02, 2021.
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #76: Noah (Moses 8): Was Noah’s Ark Designed as a Floating Temple? (Moses 8:22–30; Genesis 6:5–22; chapters 7–8).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. October 09, 2021.
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #77: Noah (Moses 8): Was Noah Drunk or in a Vision? (Genesis 9).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. October 16, 2021.
Bradshaw, Jeffrey M., Matthew L. Bowen, Ryan Dahle, Mark J. Johnson, Stephen T. Whitlock, and others. Book of Moses Essays. Seventy-Seven Essays on the Book of Moses. In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. 2020-21.
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Book of Moses FAQ.” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. May 09, 2020.
Bradshaw, Jeffrey M. “Book of Moses Textual Criticism 3: Was the Book of Moses Simply an Unplanned Afterthought to Moses 1?” The Interpreter Foundation website. September 10, 2020.
Interpreter Foundation. “Book of Moses Textual Criticism Article Preview 1: Did God or Enoch Weep?” The Interpreter Foundation website. August 27, 2020.
Interpreter Foundation. “Book of Moses Textual Criticism Article Preview 2: Were the Names ‘Mahijah’ and ‘Mahujah’ Inspired by Adam Clarke’s Commentary?” The Interpreter Foundation website. September 3, 2020.
Seely, David Rolph. “The Book of Moses: Exploring the World IN the Text.” Presented at the conference entitled “Tracing Ancient Threads of the Book of Moses” (April 23-24, 2021), Provo, UT: Brigham Young University 2021.
Seely, David Rolph. “The Book of Moses: Exploring the World OF the Text.” In Tracing Ancient Threads in the Book of Moses: Inspired Origins, Temple Contexts, and Literary Qualities, Volume 2. Edited by Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, David R. Seely, John W. Welch and Scott Gordon, 597–630. Orem, UT; Springville, UT; Redding, CA; Tooele, UT: The Interpreter Foundation, Book of Mormon Central, FAIR, and Eborn Books, 2021.
LDS Perspectives. “The Book of Revelation with Nicholas J. Frederick.” The Interpreter Foundation website. November 13, 2019.
Smoot, Stephen O. “The Book of the Dead as a Temple Text and… the Book of Abraham.” Paper presented at the 2014 Temple on Mount Zion Conference. October 25, 2014.
Smoot, Stephen O. “Book Review: An Introduction to the Book of Abraham.” The Interpreter Foundation website. September 29, 2017.
Hedelius, Cassandra S. “Book Review: Comparing and Evaluating the Scriptures: A Timely Challenge for Jews, Christians, Muslims, and Mormons.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 3 (2013): 1-5.

Review of Paul F. Fink. Comparing and Evaluating the Scriptures: A Timely Challenge for Jews, Christians, Muslims, and Mormons. Lompoc, CA: Summerland Publishing, 2008. 166 pp. $16.95 (paperback and e-book format).

Boylan, Robert S. “Book Review: Forgery and Counterforgery: The Use of Literary Deceit in Early Christian Polemics, by Bart D. Ehrman.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 3 (2013): 115-118.

Review of Bart D. Ehrman. Forgery and Counterforgery: The Use of Literary Deceit in Early Christian Polemics. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012). x + 628 pp, including bibliography and index. $39.95. Hardback.

Midgley, Louis C. “Book Review: Latter-day Scripture: Studies in the Book of Mormon, by Robert M. Price.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 1 (2012): 145-150.

Robert M. Price. Latter-day Scripture: Studies in the Book of Mormon. Self-published e-book, 2011 (http://www.eBookIt.com). 78 pp., no index, no pagination. $10.95.

Christensen, Kevin. “Book Review: Temple Mysticism: An Introduction, by Margaret Barker.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 5 (2013): 191-199.

Review of Margaret Barker, Temple Mysticism: An Introduction (London: Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge, 2011), 181 pp. $18.94.

Mitton, George L. “Book Review: Temple Themes in the Book of Moses, by Jeffrey M. Bradshaw.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 1 (2012): 57-59.
Smoot, Stephen O. “Book Review: The Council of Fifty: What the Records Reveal about Mormon History.” The Interpreter Foundation website. September 3, 2017.
Bradshaw, Jeffrey M. “‘The Book That Answers All the Questions’: Hugh Nibley and the Pearl of Great Price.” In Hugh Nibley Observed Introductory Blog Series, by Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, Interpreter Foundation, Book of Mormon Central, FAIR. 22 April 2021.

This is the fourth of eight weekly blog posts published in honor of the life and work of Hugh Nibley.

An examination of Nibley’s work with the Book of Abraham.

Gardner, Brant A. “The Book with the Unintentionally Self-Referential Title.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 12 (2014): 1-32.

Review of Earl M. Wunderli, An Imperfect Book: What the Book of Mormon Tells Us about Itself (Salt Lake City: Signature Books, 2013), 328pp + Appendices, Maps, and Index.

Earl M. Wunderli has written a book that works through the reasons he fell out of belief in the Book of Mormon. These are combined with issues that he has added to his original reasons. His presentation is clearly intended to suggest that what he found compelling will also be compelling to other readers. Should it? This review looks at how his arguments are constructed: his methodology, the logic of the analysis, and the way he uses his sources. Although he argues that it is the Book of Mormon that is the imperfect book, his construction of the arguments makes that designation ironic.

Interpreter Foundation. “Books.” The Interpreter Foundation website.
Interpreter Foundation. “Bradshaw Discusses Noah in a Series of Articles for Meridian Magazine.” The Interpreter Foundation website. October 22, 2012.
Gardner, Brant A. “Brant A. Gardner – ‘In the Visions of the Night: The Human Brain and Divine Revelation’” The Interpreter Foundation website. July 31, 2016.
Reynolds, Noel B. “The Brass Plates Version of Genesis.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 34 (2020): 63-96.

Abstract: The Book of Mormon peoples repeatedly indicated that they were descendants of Joseph, the son of Jacob who was sold into Egypt by his brothers. The plates of brass that they took with them from Jerusalem c. 600 bce provided them with a version of many Old Testament books and others not included in our Hebrew Bible. Sometime after publishing his translation of the Book of Mormon, Joseph Smith undertook an inspired revision of the Bible. The opening chapters of his version of Genesis contain a lot of material not included in the Hebrew Bible. But intriguingly, distinctive phraseology in those chapters, as now published in Joseph Smith’s Book of Moses, also show up in the Book of Mormon text. This paper presents a systematic examination of those repeated phrases and finds strong evidence for the conclusion that the version of Genesis used by the Nephite prophets must have been closely similar to Joseph Smith’s Book of Moses.

[Editor’s Note: This paper appeared first in the 1990 festschrift published to honor Hugh W. Nibley.

It is reprinted here as a convenience for current scholars who are interested in intertextual issues regarding the Book of Mormon. It should be noted that Interpreter has published another paper that picks up this same insight and develops considerable additional evidence supporting the conclusions of the original paper.

This reprint uses footnotes instead of endnotes, and there are two more footnotes in this reprint than there are endnotes in the original paper.].

Thompson, A. Keith. “The Brass Plates: Can Modern Scholarship Help Identify Their Contents?” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 45 (2021): 81-114.

Abstract: The Book of Mormon contains little information about what the Brass Plates contain. Nephi said it was a larger record than the Hebrew Bible brought to America by the Gentiles. But it could not have contained the records of Old Testament prophets who wrote after Lehi’s party left Jerusalem or the New Testament. We know it contained some writings from Zenos, Zenock, Neum, and Ezias, but what else could it have contained? Though the proposal from modern biblical source criticism that the Christian Bible is the product of redactors sometimes working with multiple sources is distasteful to many Christians, this article suggests this scholarship should not trouble Latter-day Saints, who celebrate Mormon’s scriptural abridgement of ancient American scripture. This article also revisits the insights of some Latter-day Saint scholars who have suggested the Brass Plates are a record of the tribe of Joseph, and this may explain its scriptural content. The eight verses from Micah 5, which Christ quoted three times during His visit to the Nephites and which did not previously appear in Mormon’s abridgment, receive close analysis.

Skousen, Royal. “A Brief History of Critical Text Work on the Book of Mormon.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 8 (2014): 233-248.

I begin this brief historical account of alternative work on the critical text of the Book of Mormon by including material that I wrote in an original, longer review of John S. Dinger’s Significant Textual Changes in the Book of Mormon (Smith-Pettit Foundation: Salt Lake City, Utah, 2013). The final, shorter review appears in BYU Studies 53:1 (2014). The Interpreter recently published Robert F. Smith’s review of Dinger. In these additional comments, I especially concentrate on work done in the 1970s by Stan Larson on the text of the Book of Mormon. In the latter part of this account, I discuss the more recent work of Shirley Heater in producing The Book of Mormon: Restored Covenant Edition.

Lindsay, Jeff. “A Brighter Future for Mormon Theology: Adam S. Miller’s Future Mormon.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 21 (2016): 119-146.

Review of Adam S. Miller, Future Mormon: Essays in Mormon Theology (Salt Lake City, UT: Greg Kofford Books, 2016)

Foster, Craig L. “The British Press and Mormonism – Craig L. Foster.” The Interpreter Foundation website. June 22, 2013.
Interpreter Foundation. “Brother Guy Consolmagno SJ – Keynote Address: Astronomy, God, and the Search for Elegance.” The Interpreter Foundation website. June 4, 2016.
Brown, Samuel Morris. “The Burden We Cannot Bear: Humans as Deity in Late-Modern Culture.” Paper presented at the 2016 Science & Mormonism Symposium: Body, Brain, Mind & Spirit. March 12, 2016.
Smoot, Stephen O. “‘By His Own Hand, Upon Papyrus’: Another Look.” The Interpreter Foundation website. November 14, 2013.
Gervais, Timothy, and John L. Joyce. “‘By Small Means’: Rethinking the Liahona.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 30 (2018): 207-232.

Abstract: The Liahona’s faith-based functionality and miraculous appearance have often been viewed as incongruous with natural law. This paper attempts to reconcile the Liahona to scientific law by displaying similarities between its apparent mechanisms and ancient navigation instruments called astrolabes. It further suggests the Liahona may have been a wedding dowry Ishmael provided to Lehi’s family. The paper displays the integral connection Nephi had to the Liahona’s functionality and how this connection more clearly explains the lack of faith displayed by Nephi’s band during the journey than traditional conceptions of its faith-based functionality.

“Yet I will say with regard to miracles, there is no such thing save to the ignorant — that is, there never was a result wrought out by God or by any of His creatures without there being a cause for it. There may be results, the causes of which we do not see or understand, and what we call miracles are no more than this — they are the results or effects of causes hidden from our understandings … [I]t is hard to get the people to believe that God is a scientific character, that He lives by science or strict law, that by this He is, and by law He was made what He is; and will remain to all eternity because of His faithful adherence to law. It is a most difficult thing to make the people believe that every art and science and all wisdom comes from Him, and that He is their Author.”
— Brigham Young.

Bradshaw, Jeffrey M. “‘By the Blood Ye Are Sanctified’” Paper presented at the 2016 Temple on Mount Zion Conference. November 5, 2016.
Bradshaw, Jeffrey M., and Matthew L. Bowen. “‘By the Blood Ye Are Sanctified’: The Symbolic, Salvific, Interrelated, Additive, Retrospective, and Anticipatory Nature of the Ordinances of Spiritual Rebirth in John 3 and Moses 6.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 24 (2017): 123-316.

[Editor’s Note: This article is an updated and extended version of a presentation given at the Third Interpreter Matthew B. Brown Memorial Conference: The Temple on Mount Zion, November 5, 2016, at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah. For a video version of the presentation, see https://interpreterfoundation.org/conferences/2016-temple-on-mount-zion-conference/2016-temple-on-mount-zion-conference-videos/]

Abstract: In chapter 3 of the Gospel of John, Jesus described spiritual rebirth as consisting of two parts: being “born of water and of the spirit.”

To this requirement of being “born again into the kingdom of heaven, of water, and of the Spirit,” Moses 6:59–60 adds that one must “be cleansed by blood, even the blood of mine Only Begotten; … For … by the blood ye are sanctified.”

In this article, we will discuss the symbolism of water, spirit, and blood in scripture as they are actualized in the process of spiritual rebirth. We will highlight in particular the symbolic, salvific, interrelated, additive, retrospective, and anticipatory nature of these ordinances within the allusive and sometimes enigmatic descriptions of John 3 and Moses 6. Moses 6:51–68, with its dense infusion of temple themes, was revealed to the Prophet in December 1830, when the Church was in its infancy and more than a decade before the fulness of priesthood ordinances was made available to the Saints in Nauvoo. Our study of these chapters informs our closing perspective on the meaning of the sacrament, which is consistent with the recent re-emphasis of Church leaders that the “sacrament is a beautiful time to not just renew our baptismal covenants, but to commit to Him to renew all our covenants.”

We discuss the relationship of the sacrament to the shewbread of Israelite temples, and its anticipation of the heavenly feast that will be enjoyed by those who have been sanctified by the blood of Jesus Christ.