There are 7 thoughts on “To “See and Hear””.

  1. This is a wonderful analysis, thank you Kevin.
    It is fascinating to me how the Book of Mormon is able to not only utilize, but clarify and improve on so many elements of the Bible that are mostly lost or misunderstood in our day.
    The story of Daniel (10) is another ex:
    5 Then I lifted up mine eyes, and looked, and behold a certain man clothed in linen, whose loins were girded with fine gold of Uphaz:
    6 His body also was like the beryl, and his face as the appearance of lightning, and his eyes as lamps of fire, and his arms and his feet like in colour to polished brass, and the voice of his words like the voice of a multitude.
    7 And I Daniel alone saw the vision: for the men that were with me saw not the vision; but a great quaking fell upon them, so that they fled to hide themselves.
    8 Therefore I was left alone, and saw this great vision, and there remained no strength in me: for my comeliness was turned in me into corruption, and I retained no strength.
    9 Yet heard I the voice of his words: and when I heard the voice of his words, then was I in a deep sleep on my face, and my face toward the ground.
    10 ¶And, behold, an hand touched me, which set me upon my knees and upon the palms of my hands.
    11 And he said unto me, O Daniel, a man greatly beloved, understand the words that I speak unto thee, and stand upright: for unto thee am I now sent. And when he had spoken this word unto me, I stood trembling.
    12 Then said he unto me, Fear not, Daniel: for from the first day that thou didst set thine heart to understand, and to chasten thyself before thy God, thy words were heard, and I am come for thy words.
    Here we see another element of a true witness. He also touched the Lord. This brings to mind two things. One is the story of Abraham (Gen. 18) , the other is the phrase in 3 Nephi 11:
    13 And it came to pass that the Lord spake unto them saying:
    14 Arise and come forth unto me, that ye may thrust your hands into my side, and also that ye may feel the prints of the nails in my hands and in my feet, that ye may know that I am the God of Israel, and the God of the whole earth, and have been slain for the sins of the world.
    15 And it came to pass that the multitude went forth, and thrust their hands into his side, and did feel the prints of the nails in his hands and in his feet; and this they did do, going forth one by one until they had all gone forth, and did see with their eyes and did feel with their hands, and did know of a surety and did bear record, that it was he, of whom it was written by the prophets, that should come.
    We see here the complete measure of knowledge–hearing the voice of the Lord, seeing AND touching Him, that they might know and bear witness of His name.
    When the day comes that enough of us rise up and gain this witness, we will finally see how “They shall not hurt nor destroy in all my holy mountain, for the earth shall be full of the knowledge of the Lord, as the waters cover the sea.”
    May we rise up, so that the glorious day of the Lord may come swiftly!
    Jeff

  2. Although the experience does not replace the need to be called and set apart, it does describe a divine commission and entitles the individual to carry the title of “witness.”

    In light of this sentence, it is odd that the chart at the end doesn’t include a row documenting the “calling” and “setting apart” of each witness. It seems obvious to me that the experience alone defines a witness, and that “calling” and “setting apart,” except they occur in heaven, are entirely irrelevant.
    It is my conviction that this article, along with Hamblin’s essay on the Sod of YHWH, are essential reading to understanding the faith Joseph restored.

  3. I enjoyed this essay. Without mentioning certain cultural Mormon critics of the book of Mormon Kevin Jolley challenges those critics who have recently asserted that the mode of discourse in the Book of Mormon runs counter to the way Jews interpreted the scriptures and hence the Book of Mormon is rubbish. My impression is that such critics have no idea what they are talking about.

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